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Daily Archives: January 10, 2017

The Greatest Detroit Tiger By Position: Shortstop

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After the ugliness of what is the history of Tigers playing third base, we move to what I am guessing is an easier decision with the Shortstop position.  If you missed the greatest Tigers catcher, first baseman, second baseman, or third base, you can catch up at any point by clicking on the hyperlinks.

Again, the only qualifier in my process for determining the best positional Detroit Tiger is that they played at least five years as a Tiger with a majority of their games at that position.  Qualifying for shortstop is Alan Trammell, Donie Bush, Billy Rogell, Harvey Kuenn, and (ahem) Deivi Cruz.  We boot Deivi to start with his 6.0 WAR as a Tiger.

Here we go in chronological order of when the player was in Detroit…

Continue reading @ Sons of ’84

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The Selig Years, Pt. Three: Big League Baseball’s Current Position

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No league in any major sport enjoys a similar position to MLB either domestically or internationally. While the NFL and the National Basketball Association (NBA) are extremely popular multi-billion-dollar industries with lucrative contracts for players largely funded by cable providers and strong Internet strategies, they do not monopolize all of organized football and basketball in the United States the way MLB does for baseball. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) enjoys a close relationship with the NFL and the NBA, but it is independent of those professional organizations. Although college basketball and football function essentially as minor leagues for the NBA and the NFL, respectively, they are not affiliated with those professional leagues… (READ THE FULL STORY ON PLATECOVERAGE.COM)

Sully Baseball Daily Podcast – January 10, 2017

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Doug Pensinger/Getty Images North America

There are no Colorado Rockies in the Hall of Fame. I suggested they trade for Ichiro Suzuki to ensure one player will have worn the CR on their hat and made it to Cooperstown.

But Larry Walker and Todd Helton might put a beloved Rockie in the Hall.

It is a Rocky Mountain High episode of The Sully Baseball Daily Podcast.

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TORONTO BLUE JAYS & RUN PREVENTION, THEY’RE GONNA NEED IT!

 

JAYS FROM THE COUCH LOOKS AT THE TORONTO BLUE JAYS ABILITY TO MAKE UP FOR LOST HR POWER WITH RUN PREVENTION IN 2017

 

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The long and short of it is that teams can make up 20 HR in today’s game rather cheaply easily, so paying through the teeth for 35 HR doesn’t make much sense. Why pay so much more for what is only a small increase in the long ball. Guys who hit that many home runs have to be able to offer another skill set in order to be perceived as having value these days. The most obvious of those skill sets comes on the other side of the ball- defense.

 

Specifically, we are starting to see executives put more value on run prevention. If you can prevent a few more runs in a season, you don’t need to see as many leave the park. It is a logical approach- one that seems to be taking hold across baseball. This ‘renaissance’, if you will, is due to the advanced metrics, etc that teams pay lots of money for and keep close to their vests. Everyone has their system.

 

All of the above got me thinking about how the Toronto Blue Jays will look in 2017…

READ FULL POST at Jays From the Couch

Carlos Correa Is the Most Important Part of the Houston Astros Offense in 2017

After ending their excruciating rebuilding process a year earlier than many expected with a playoff appearance in 2015, the Houston Astros were supposed to take another step forward in 2016, but it didn’t happen.

Jose Altuve put together an MVP-caliber performance, but Houston experienced regression from some of its young core and ultimately couldn’t overcome a 7-17 start. Their 4-15 record against the Texas Rangers didn’t help, either.

One of those young players who experienced a bumpy year was shortstop Carlos Correa.

Now, it’s tough to say a player who posted a 122 wRC+ and a 4.9 fWAR had a bad year, and Correa didn’t have a bad year – it just wasn’t what the organization was likely hoping for.

After an active offseason (which still may not be finished), expectations are high for the Astros to return to October. There are plenty of important offensive contributors on the roster, but Correa just may be the most important of all.

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