Daily Archives: January 5, 2017

TORONTO BLUE JAYS HOT STOVE: GAVIN FLOYD RETURNS ON MINOR-LEAGUE PACT

 

THE TORONTO BLUE JAYS ARE BRINGING BACK GAVIN FLOYD ON A MINOR LEAGUE DEAL, HOPING HE CAN CONTRIBUTE IN 2017

 

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While much of the Blue Jays fan base reacts to the Cleveland Indians press conference introducing ex-Blue Jay Edwin Encarnacion, the Blue Jays front office snuck an old friend back into the organization today on a minor-league deal. Gavin Floyd will be returning to the Blue Jays with an invite to Spring Training and as it stands right now – a likely spot on the roster come April.

 

Floyd pitched well in 2016 and posted decent numbers aside from a few blow-ups. In April he posted a 1.74 ERA over 10.1 innings, recovering from a rough start and eventually posting eight strikeouts to three walks and four hits for the rest of the month. In May he battled with the long ball, giving up four dingers in just 12.2 IP, but still maintaining a K/9 over 9.00…

 

READ FULL POST  at Jays From the Couch

Sully Baseball Daily Podcast – January 5, 2017

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Former big league (and Brandeis!) pitcher Nelson Figueroa joins the podcast. He discussed his Annual Charity Bowl in New York as well as his career which took him from Brooklyn to Queens by way of Arizona, Philadelphia, Taiwan and the Caribbean.

Pitching and rolling strikes on this episode of The Sully Baseball Daily Podcast.

Click here for info about the Charity Bowl.

Follow Nelson on Twitter by clicking HERE.

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The Selig Years

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“The Selig Years” from Will Big League Baseball Survive?: Globalization, the End of Television, Youth Sports, and the Future of Major League Baseball by Lincoln A. Mitchell. Used by permission of Temple University Press. © 2017 by Lincoln A. Mitchell. All Rights Reserved.

In January 2015, Bud Selig stepped down as commissioner of baseball. He had served in that position since September 1992, although for the first six of those years, he had been acting com­missioner. Selig’s tenure of slightly more than twenty-two years was the second longest in baseball history. Only Major League Base­ball’s (MLB’s) first commissioner, Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis, served longer.

When Selig took over as commissioner, there were twenty-six Major League teams. To make the play-offs, teams had to win one of the four divisions, as there were no wild cards. There was no interleague play during the regular season, and steroid use was extremely rare and almost never discussed.  (READ THE FULL STORY ON PLATE COVERAGE)

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