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How All Of The Rockies Hitters Were Acquired: 2014 Roster Tree – Injuries + A Coors Field Factor

carlos gonzalez

How All Of The Rockies Hitters Were Acquired:

By Chuck Booth (Lead Baseball Analyst/Website Owner):

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The Rockies are one of the weirdest franchises around in the game of baseball today.

Thin air, humidors, pitcher who struggle, however where they are one of the most dynamic teams is in fantasy baseball.

I have said it before and will say it again…I would love to watch games at Coors Field 81 times a year.

For everyone that loves offense, then watching this squad bash the ball around is awesome. Unfortunately the hitters have had a tough problem staying healthy in recent years.

Carlos Gonzalez and Troy Tulowitzki are world class players.  Both would be in the running for NL MVP every year, it is just they can’t maintain in the lineup.

When you look at the roster, it is composed mostly of draft picks. Read the rest of this entry

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The Humidor Effect On Baseballs At Coors Field: 11 Years In

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Tuesday Aug.06/2013

Since the Humidor room has been put into use at Coors Field, Team batting averages have dropped 8-10% and HRs have dropped 20-25% yearly.  The Rockies still have routinely finished in the top 7 in all offensive categories for every year since 2002.  This year, they lead MLB in every offensive category.

By Chuck Booth (Lead Baseball Analyst/Website Owner):

In the first 10 years of Coors Field, or the Rockies existence for that matter, the baseballs were being belted out of the park at a historically record rate. 

Some of this was due to the steroid era.  Most of it was arrived at by the dry air of Colorado.

The reason is simple, in dry air the ball travels further than in thin air, thus causing more frequent home runs. 

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Triple Play Podcast Ep # 13 – Around The Horn w/OAK/KC/COL/TOR + Bean Wars + The Genius Beane

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Monday, June.17, 2013

The Triple Play Show will have 5 shows per month.  Each show will be about 1 hour

The Triple Play Show will have 5 shows per month. Each show will be about 1 hour.

By The Big Ticket Show ( AKA Triple Play Podcast on http://www.mlbreports.com)

Guests in this Podcast – Chuck Booth (MLB Reports Owner and Lead Analyst) 

On this week’s show Chuck Booth joins us to break down all the biggest stories in MLB. We also go Around the Horn with Chuck to discuss the A’s, Rockies and Royals current situations and declare the worthy few that belong on their respective Mt Rushmore’s. Bethubb.com best bets end the show as always. Happy Father’s Day!!!!!!!

Intro – 10 Minutes, Toronto Blue Jays talk from 10 Minute to the 18 Minute Mark.  OAK chat – 18 minute – 33 Minute Mark, COL Talk 33 Minutes – 44 Minute Mark.  Kansas City Royals Chart 44 Minutes Mark – 59 Minute Mark.  Late Jays Talk Bethubb Best Bets 1 hour 1 MIN mark to 1 hour 9 Minute Mark.

Quick Facts:  Catsfish Hunter was 7 – 2 in the Post Season for the 1972, 1973 and 1974 World Series Winning A’s – and only 2 -4 with the 3 Post Seasons with the Yankees.  Still 5 World Series Winners was great.  Chuck also meant Ewing Kauffman (Chuck thought his nickname was Charlie in the podcast – maybe because his name his Charlie) when talking about the Royals MT. Rushmore for the franchise.

Yogi Berra did indeed play in 14 World Series and won 10 of them in his Yankees days.

To Keep Reading and Listen to this Podcast click the READ THE REST OF THIS ENTRY or scroll past the Triple Play Logo.

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Sully Baseball Daily Podcast – April 28, 2013

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I dedicate today’s episode The Sully Baseball Daily Podcast to my brother, the amazingly talented Ted Sullivan. I talk a little bit about us growing up, the different ways we celebrated baseball and how we shared a baseball moment as recently as 2008.

Travis Hafner, Bryce Harper, Travis Wood and Matt Moore owned baseball on April 27, 2013.

To see the up to date tally of “Who Owns Baseball?”, click HERE.


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Sully Baseball Daily Podcast – April 28, 2013

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Can Lester And Co. Weather The Power Outage?

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Monday, Mar.18, 2013

After coming off of 18 up and 18 out (6 perfect Innings) - Lester bolsters a 3 - 0 record in Spring Training with a miniscule 0.90 ERA in 20.0 IP.  Lester will need to be dominant if the Red Sox hitters continue to battle injuries for the remainder of the season.

After coming off of 18 up and 18 out (6 perfect Innings) – Lester bolsters a 3 – 0 record in Spring Training with a miniscule 0.90 ERA in 20.0 IP. Lester will need to be dominant if the Red Sox best hitters continue to battle injuries for the remainder of the season.

By Saul Wisnia,  Red Sox Correspondent (Read his blog ‘Fenway Reflections’ here):

Pitching and timely hitting. The Red Sox are getting plenty of both this spring training, but will it be enough if they can’t hit the ball out of the park?

It was on Sunday, when the green-clad Sox got 6 perfect Innings from Jon Lester and allowed just one Ninth-Inning Infield hit in a 5-1 victory over the Rays at Jet Blue Park. The big Left Hander and projected staff ace – is now 3-0 with an 0.90 ERA, six hits allowed, and 16 Strikeouts in 20 Grapefruit League Innings. 

Those numbers are very encouraging, and he is just one of numerous Boston pitchers having a terrific exhibition season as the staff aims to rebound from a dreadful 2012. Starters Lester, Clay Buchholz,and Ryan Dempster are a combined 6-1 with an 0.88 ERA, and even John Lackey is 2-0 with an improved physique and attitude. At least three of these guys should top last year’s team “high” of 11 victories by Buchholz and Felix Doubront.

Red Sox Batting Practice in 2013 Spring Training:

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The Coors Field Effect: Part 3 of A 3 Article Series

Wednesday, September.19/2012

Even with playing teams in the NL West with Parks like Petco, Dodger Stadium and AT &T Park, a Rockies player gets 81 games of AB versus 27 against the other 3 California parks or a 75-25 % split. The Rockies continue to lead the MLB for Home Averages year in and year out-even with the Humidor Room taking effect.

Chuck Booth (Lead Baseball Writer):

Both myself (and Lead Baseball Columnist and Founder) Jonathan Hacohen think alike on some points as writers will often do when working for the same website.  Jonathan wrote a brilliant piece on the ballooned numbers that a player in Colorado receives as a byproduct of playing at Coors Field.  My head started spinning and swirling and I knew it to be true from my memory bank.  My Part 2 column, dissected the Coors Field Effect on some previous players, plus what has transpired in the last decade since the Humidor Room has been implemented.  You must read the 1st 2 parts of this series to fully understand what I am going to tell you here.

For Part 1 of the Article Series:  Carlos Gonzalez on the Trade Block? Buyer Beware!  click here

For Part 2 of the Article Series:  The Humidor Effect at Coors Field-One Decade in click here

The numbers don’t lie in either of the first two parts to this series- with the Rockies having led the league in 19 out of the 20 Years for Home Batting Average overall in the MLB and every year in the NL since they have existed.  This includes heavy hitting AL clubs, with hitter friendly parks such as: Yankee Stadium (Old or New), Citizens Bank Ball Park or Fenway Park.  What people also fail to realize is that the Pitchers also account for about 140-150 AB at home per year.  So really there is no way a Colorado team should have a higher BA than a team from the AL if that is the case?  Wrong.  The Batting averages for positional players from 1993-2002 in Colorado ranged from an average of .325-.345 every year.  May I point out they also led the Major Leagues in overall batting average every year for this span in the Pre-Humidor days too!

A Todd Helton Walk-off Shot at Coors:

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The Humidor Effect On Baseballs at Coors Field: One Decade In Part 2 of 3 Article Series

Saturday, July. 14/2012

Since the Humidor room has been put into use at Coors Field, Team batting averages have dropped 8-10% and HRs have dropped 20-25% yearly.  The Rockies still have routinely finished in the top 7 in all offensive categories for every year since 2002.  This year, they lead MLB in every offensive category.

Chuck Booth (Lead Baseball Writer and @chuckbooth3024 on twitter)– In the first 10 years of Coors Field, or the Rockies existence for that matter, the baseballs were being belted out of the park at a historically record rate.  Some of this was due to the steroid era.  Most of it was arrived at by the dry air of Colorado.  The reason is simple, in dry air the ball travels further than in thin air, thus causing more frequent home runs.  Baseballs being stored in drier air become harder and therefore explode off of a bat when contacted.   After nearly a decade with inflated numbers at Coors Field for offense, a decision was made by baseball and the Colorado Rockies to start holding/storing the game baseballs  in a  room-sized Humidor-that was installed at the Park in order to keep them moist.  This was done so the baseballs will not carry as far when hit with impact.  Elevation would still play a role in the baseball games. Baseballs carry farther in the thinner air and especially when they are rising in trajectory. Remember that in Denver, you are nearly a mile above sea level already.  In fact, there are purple bleacher tickets that you can buy at Coors Field  that indicate where that mile marker is. 

The cause and effect is harder on pitchers, whose curveballs curve less with the thin air than at sea level-leading to fewer strikeouts and the result is less pitches to use in their arsenal.   So has the Humidor worked since being implemented before the start of the 2002 season?  The answer is yes.  The amount of HRs hit now sits with the rest of the MLB Parks that are amongst the top 10 over the last decade.  The averages have dropped only around 10% of what they were, however Colorado is routinely in the top 4 or 5 parks for average on a yearly basis in the MLB and dominate the NL in home average.  In 2012, the hotter temperatures(and dry air) have   helped  the team to lead every offensive category in the Major Leagues once again.  Now, there is still a decisive advantage to playing at Coors for hitters when it comes to playing an 81 game schedule there.  I am going to look at the careers of some previous players to show you the weighted advantage of having this park as a home venue.  We are going to look at the careers of Larry Walker, Todd Helton, Carlos Gonzalez and Garrett Atkins.  It is easier to use the hitters as a barometer when deciphering this study because not many pitchers ever prosper again in any city after playing for the Colorado Rockies. See: (Jeff Francis, Ubaldo Jimenez, Mike Hampton and Jason Jennings once they left Coors Field or before they arrived at Denver after playing somewhere else first.)

For Part 1 of the Article Series:  Carlos Gonzalez on the Trade Block? Buyer Beware!  click here .

For Part 3 of the Article Series:  The Coors Field Effect: Part 3 of A 3 Article Series click here.

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Top Ten Stat of the Week: Players with 40 HRs on 4 Different Teams Or More

Monday July.02/2012

Gary Sheffield hit 30 HRs and 120 RBI in both 2004 and 2005 for the Yankees before injuries held him to just 39 games in 2006. Sheffield also hit 40+HRs on 5 other teams (per stay) besides the Bronx Bombers in his career. –Photo courtesy of exposay.com

Chuck Booth (Lead Baseball Writer and @chuckbooth3024 on twitter)- As the world of Twitter and Facebook has invaded the internet these days, I am brainstorming about all sorts of stats I have had in my head for years.  This stat came to my head because of Gary Sheffield.  A few years back, I watched a game on my birthday at Safeco Field.  It was the New York Yankees and Sheffield visiting.  There are players that you are sure to watch live in person.  Gary Sheffield was one of these hitters.   Not only is he one of 25 player in history to hit 500 HRs, but he had one of the fiercest swings ever.  The man would wiggle that bat back and forth like a toothpick before striding and swinging with daunting ferocity.  It was an unorthodox style that must have made Little League coaches cringe, yet it was effective.  Sheffield was a bit of a hot head though, this may have led to him being traded or not re-signed by several teams.  Hitting 40 HRs for 6 different teams is definitely impressive and may never be duplicated.  I knew he had played on several teams already so the seed of today’s article was planted back in 2005.

Fred McGriff was the exact opposite of Gary Sheffield when it came to temperament.  This man was traded several times in his career because he could flat-out hit.  Jose Canseco is the only other player besides McGriff and Sheffield to hit 40 HRs with 5 different teams.  The reason many older players are not on this list is because free agency never arrived in the MLB until the early 70’s when Curt Flood challenged a trade and the Players Union saw it through.  Now player movement has enabled more players switching teams each season than ever before.  Rusty Staub was the 1st to make this list and Alfonso Soriano is the last player to make this list and the only current player left.  I have a feeling we will see more players arrive on this list in the next 25 years.

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