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Daily Archives: December 19, 2015

Baseball Hall Of Fame and Alan Trammel; Stacking Up Against Yount, Ripken, Ozzie, & Larkin

trammell pic

Now that we’ve taken a look at how Alan Trammell stacks up against other shortstops in the Hall, let’s take a look at how he stacks up against Shortstops in the Hall from his era which include Robin Yount, Cal Ripken Jr., Ozzie Smith, and then specifically against Barry Larkin as he was not in the Hall at the the time this was originally written.

I took a look at standard Hall of Fame stats as well as some simple Sabermetrics and then others like awards, games played at other positions, etc. Finally I took a look at Baseball-Reference.com’s who are they most like for their career. Take a look at how Tram faired…

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Opt-out Clause Is A Black Eye For Baseball

soap-boxopt-out clause – a clause that permits signatories to a contract to opt out of particular provisions, or to terminate the contract early.

I make no bones about it, I abhor the opt-out clauses that are being given to major league players today. MLB players today make millions of dollars a year and still they ask for and get opt-out clauses in their contracts. What is up with that?

To my way of thinking it is simple out and out GREED on the part of players and their agents. An opt-out clause in a baseball contract makes it totally one sided in favor of the player. The plan probably was originated by an agent that realized that there was more money to be made by negotiating more contracts. The players today have no loyalty to their teams or their fans what so ever and their single focus is putting more money in their pockets. They claim that they are doing all they can for the team but that is all BS, or they wouldn’t bail out of a contract if it was advantageous to them.

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Sully Baseball Daily Podcast – December 19, 2015

oakland11825633_10154128006129937_6927647229696175795_nBaseball is recommending putting more nets for fan safety at ball parks.

That seems like a no brainer, doesn’t it?

Better to be safe than sorry in this episode of The Sully Baseball Daily Podcast.

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Ranking The Top Rookie Baseball Card Classes From Topps For The Last 31 Years; 10-1

2011 topps mike trout

For the last couple of days, I’ve been ranking the top rookie classes for the last 31 years from Topps Baseball Cards with rankings from ranked 31-21 and yesterday we covered 20-11.  Today we wrap up with my top 10, but before we get to that, here’s a little more background…

To start off, I am only going to use Topps and not any of its offshoot brands like Bowman or Finest.  I’ll use the standard series cards and include traded/update sets as well.  The term rookie card had only been defined in the last decade so things may not always be apples to apples.  From 2006 on, a Rookie Card can only be established once a player has played in a Major League game.  This makes update sets incredibly important as they catch the late call-ups in their sets.

Additionally, Topps backed off rookie cards for a while it seemed by allowing Bowman (their rookie card brand since 1989) to get the first cards of players like Mariano Rivera, or other manufactures may steal the Rookie Card title altogether like Fleer did with David Ortiz.  You’ll also notice duplication of some rookie cards in the ‘80’s since the players cards that came out in traded sets were considered XRC (extended rookie cards) since the cards were only sold in set form and away from the standard sets.

I’ll look at Hall of Famers, potential Hall of Famers, impact players, overall potential, etc. and remember…the PED era has nothing to do with anything in my opinion.  Here we go…

View the Top 10…

Ranking The Top Rookie Baseball Card Classes From Topps For The Last 31 Years; 20-11

2003 Topps Robinson Cano

Yesterday I started looking at the top rookie classes for the last 31 years from Topps Baseball Cards and ranked 31-21.  Today we move on down the list, looking at the classes ranked 20-11.  Before we get to that however, here’s a little more background…

To start off, I am only going to use Topps and not any of its offshoot brands like Bowman or Finest.  I’ll use the standard series cards and include traded/update sets as well.  The term rookie card had only been defined in the last decade so things may not always be apples to apples.  From 2006 on, a Rookie Card can only be established once a player has played in a Major League game.  This makes update sets incredibly important as they catch the late call-ups in their sets.

Additionally, Topps backed off rookie cards for a while it seemed by allowing Bowman (their rookie card brand since 1989) to get the first cards of players like Mariano Rivera, or other manufactures may steal the Rookie Card title altogether like Fleer did with David Ortiz.  You’ll also notice duplication of some rookie cards in the ‘80’s since the players cards that came out in traded sets were considered XRC (extended rookie cards) since the cards were only sold in set form and away from the standard sets.

I’ll look at Hall of Famers, potential Hall of Famers, impact players, overall potential, etc. and remember…the PED era has nothing to do with anything in my opinion.  Here we go…

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