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Daily Archives: July 2, 2012

Top Ten Stat of the Week: Players with 40 HRs on 4 Different Teams Or More

Monday July.02/2012

Gary Sheffield hit 30 HRs and 120 RBI in both 2004 and 2005 for the Yankees before injuries held him to just 39 games in 2006. Sheffield also hit 40+HRs on 5 other teams (per stay) besides the Bronx Bombers in his career. –Photo courtesy of exposay.com

Chuck Booth (Lead Baseball Writer and @chuckbooth3024 on twitter)- As the world of Twitter and Facebook has invaded the internet these days, I am brainstorming about all sorts of stats I have had in my head for years.  This stat came to my head because of Gary Sheffield.  A few years back, I watched a game on my birthday at Safeco Field.  It was the New York Yankees and Sheffield visiting.  There are players that you are sure to watch live in person.  Gary Sheffield was one of these hitters.   Not only is he one of 25 player in history to hit 500 HRs, but he had one of the fiercest swings ever.  The man would wiggle that bat back and forth like a toothpick before striding and swinging with daunting ferocity.  It was an unorthodox style that must have made Little League coaches cringe, yet it was effective.  Sheffield was a bit of a hot head though, this may have led to him being traded or not re-signed by several teams.  Hitting 40 HRs for 6 different teams is definitely impressive and may never be duplicated.  I knew he had played on several teams already so the seed of today’s article was planted back in 2005.

Fred McGriff was the exact opposite of Gary Sheffield when it came to temperament.  This man was traded several times in his career because he could flat-out hit.  Jose Canseco is the only other player besides McGriff and Sheffield to hit 40 HRs with 5 different teams.  The reason many older players are not on this list is because free agency never arrived in the MLB until the early 70’s when Curt Flood challenged a trade and the Players Union saw it through.  Now player movement has enabled more players switching teams each season than ever before.  Rusty Staub was the 1st to make this list and Alfonso Soriano is the last player to make this list and the only current player left.  I have a feeling we will see more players arrive on this list in the next 25 years.

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“Fenway Fever”: By John H. Ritter – Baseball Book Review

Monday July 2nd, 2012

“FENWAY FEVER” –  BY JOHN H. RITTER

(Philomel Books:  2012)

MLB reports – Jonathan Hacohen:  2012 is many things folks in the world of professional baseball. It is the year of the no-hitter. The year of the Tommy John surgeries. We have seen an unprecedented number of no-no’s and TJs already this year. It is also Fenway Park’s 100th year anniversary. Happy Birthday Fenway! It is also the year that the Youk chant died. Boston’s beloved son, Kevin Youkilis, was traded from Boston to Chicago this year as well. For a year filled with baseball emotions, none have flown farther and deeper than in Boston. With our Red Sox faithful in mind, our latest book review centers on the hub of Red Sox nation. The book is titled Fenway Fever, by John H. Ritter.

Along with all the other events taking place in this year’s MLB season, we have also seen an explosion of baseball book like no other. It seems literally that every week, a new baseball title comes across my desk. With so many books to choose from, it becomes difficult for the average baseball fan to choose the title that works for them. Here on MLB reports, we have a dedicated Baseball Book Reviews page, dedicated just for that purpose. To bring you up to speed to the latest baseball book titles and help you select the right one for you.

Here is a little sneak peek into “Fenway Fever”:

“Stats” Pagano may have been born with a heart defect, but he lives for three things: his family’s hot dog stand right outside fabled Fenway Park, his beloved Red Sox, and any baseball statistic imaginable. When the family can no longer make ends meet with the hot dog stand, life becomes worrisome for Stats. Then the Sox go on a long losing streak and the team’s ace pitcher—and Stats’s idol—becomes convinced the famed Curse of the Bambino has returned. Stats just has to help . . . but how? As the Sox faithful sour on their team, Stats forms a plan that ultimately unifies an entire city and proves that true loyalty has a magic all its own.  Read the rest of this entry

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