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Daily Archives: July 15, 2012

An Average Day for Billy Hamilton on the Basepaths

Sunday, July 15th, 2012

Sam Evans: Dark shadows cast over a luminous sky at Municipal Stadium in San Jose, California. A crowd of just fewer than four thousand people bask in the early June sunlight, some of them unaware of the history they are about to witness. The San Jose Giants are hosting the Bakersfield Blaze, and Billy Hamilton is hitting leadoff for a Bakersfield team centered around their 5’11” 160 pound shortstop. Never before in professional baseball have we seen a player like Billy Hamilton.

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Top Ten Stat Of The Week: (Active Pitchers Winning Pctg-Min 100 Decisions)

Sunday July.15/2012

Lester had started his career 61-26 (.709) before he has pitched to a 20-15 record the last two seasons (.571). Lester still leads the active pitchers in Winning Percentage. Photo courtesy of http://www.bostonsportssu18.com

Chuck Booth (Lead Baseball Writer and @chuckbooth3024 on twitter)-Piching wins are given less importance  all of the time by the sabermetric community.  I am here to refute these findings.  A won-loss category is still very important in a pitchers career.  Yes there are definite exceptions.  Nolan Ryan played for a lot of mediocre teams and that is why he is 324-292 all time.  I would definitely say the modern pitchers Matt Cain 78-76 and Felix Hernandez have valid arguments why their won-loss percentages are way lower than they should be.  Recent Cy Young winners were voted on more for other periphery stats such as: ERA, WHIP, OBA and WAR.

I often think of Jack Morris when I hear this.  He had the situational pitching down perfect between 1983-1993.  The man won 4 World Series with 3 different teams.  Morris posted a 254-186 record (.577) and he has an ERA for his career at 3.90.  At first glance you may scoff at the notion of a near 4.00 ERA before the steroid era.  You had to watch his games to see where he was coming from.  He was on great offensive teams and would have large run support from time to time.  Jack Morris would challenge hitters by pitching to contact.  Sometimes the hitters would get the better of him in these lopsided games.  If you were a hitter, you were going to get no free pass from Big Jack.  His 175 complete games were a testament to his duration.  Morris also led the 1980’s in pitching wins.  He was just as capable of pitching in a low scoring, close game as evidence by his 1-0 World Series 10 innings pitched win in-game #7 of the 1991 World Series versus the Braves.  The gentlemen on this list all can throw complete games like Jack Morris did.  All of these pitchers have logged huge innings at parts of their careers.  Read the rest of this entry

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