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An American Hobby: Baseball Memorabilia – ‘Mel Ott’ Card From 1935

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Sunday, March.24, 2013

Mel Ott was a Hall Of Fame Player that spent his whole Career wit the New York Giants.  He ranks 4th in ALL - Time HRs for players that played for just 1 team behind Schmidt (548), Mantle (536), and  Banks (512)

Mel Ott was a Hall Of Fame Player that spent his whole Career with the New York Giants. He ranks 4th in ALL – Time HRs for players that played for just 1 team behind Schmidt – PHI (548), Mickey Mantle – NYY (536), and Ernie Banks – CHC (512).   Ott made every ALL – Star Game (33 – ’44}.  He led the NL in Home Runs and Walk 6 times each.  Ott had 8 straight 100 + RBI years from Age 20 – 28.  At the Age of 20 (1929), he had his best year with 42 HRs, 151 RBI and a 3 Slash Line of .328/.449/1.084.

By Lee Edelstein (‘Baseball Memorabilia Enthusiast’ – visit his website here)

MLB Reports:  We are pleased to present you with Baseball Author Lee Edelstein as the newest writer with us at the Reports.  Lee will be providing us with great stories about baseball memorabilia on a regular basis.

MLB Reports

An American Hobby

Blog 6

Mel Ott

Collecting baseball cards is a uniquely American hobby.  As a kid growing up in the 1950’s I had shoeboxes full of them.  All of my friends did, too.  We had so many cards that, when we got older and our interests shifted to teenage pursuits, our moms decided to clean house. Literally.  Out went the cards which they considered to be nothing more than junk.  Today, we wax nostalgic over those cardboard canvasses of our heroes that we treated so casually.  That’s also why, in good condition, they are worth small fortunes.

I renewed my interest in card collecting a few years ago when I decided to build a collection of the elites of the game – the ballplayers who are members of three very exclusive clubs: 300 Wins, 3,000 Hits, and 500 Home Runs.  It’s an exclusive membership that includes players from before the turn of the twentieth century (Kid Nichols #7 with 361 wins) through players who are active today (Derek Jeter is currently #10 on the all-time hit list with 3,304 hits):

  • 300 Wins – 24 players
  • 3,000 Hits – 28 players          
  • 500 Home Runs – 25 players

Each week, I’ll feature a baseball card of one of these all-time greats.  Along the way, we’ll talk about other aspects of America’s Hobby, why it continues to grow in popularity, and answer any questions you may have.

1933 World Series Recap – Including a HR by Mel Ott!

The Front Of The Historic Card

The Front Of The Historic Card.

You don’t hear a lot about Mel Ott these days but he was one of the all-time great ballplayers.  Ott was the first National Leaguer to hit 500 Home Runs.  He is in the top thirty in career records for a host of offensive categories including Home Runs (#23), RBI (#12), Runs (#14), Walks (#9), Total Bases (#19), OPS (#23), OBP (#28), and WAR (#16).  Not bad for a ballplayer who was all of 5’9” and weighed 160 pounds.  The secret to his fearsome slugging is revealed on the back of his 1935 Diamond Stars baseball card –

“Weighing only 160 pounds, he is one of the leading long distance hitters of the game.  Ott gets his power by timing his swing to meet the ball on the ‘sweet part’ of the bat which is about seven inches from the business end.  Timing comes from long batting practice, in which the batter does NOT try to kill the ball so much as to meet it evenly and easily.”

Ott played his entire twenty-two year career with the New York Giants (one of only six Major Leaguers with 20+ year careers with one team).  He led his team in Home Runs for eighteen consecutive years (1928-45), a Major League record.  He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1951 and was rated #42 in Sporting News 1999 list of the top 100 greatest players.

Ott’s 1935 Diamond Stars card shown above is graded 9 (mint) by PSA, the highest grade for this card.  Its value is approximately $3,000.

Back of the Mel Ott Card - Diamond Stars Series 1935

Back of the Mel Ott Card – Diamond Stars Series 1935.

Do you have any Mel Ott memorabilia – let us know!

***The views and opinions expressed in this report are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of mlbreports.com or their partners***

a     lee edelstein

A big thank-you goes out to Our ‘Baseball Memorabilia Enthusiast’ Lee Edelstein for preparing today’s featured article. Lee was born and raised in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn, New York.  He inherited his love of baseball from his dad. The game has been Lee’s constant companion since he was seven years old – when his dad took him to see his first ball game at Ebbets Field.   This was followed by a brief and largely unsuccessful Little League career.  While he wasn’t all that good on the ball field he became an ALL-Star at collecting baseball cards. 

His collection is still alive today after surviving many scares over the years. Lee was also much better at business than playing baseball.  He was good enough that he was able to retire and pursue his other passion – writing about baseball! Chin Music is his first novel. He is hard at work on his second, Mound Music. You can read a full overview and find links to purchase here and also check out a quick synopsis in the picture below.  Feel Free to follow Lee on Twitter and chat about the game of baseball. 

Sixteen-year-old Ryan Buck is a talented athlete who was fortunate to escape with minor injuries from the horrific car crash that devastated his family.   Two-and-a-half years and countless hours of therapy later, Ryan still can’t remember a thing about the accident and it’s making for agonizingly slow progress. But everything changes when his mom, Susan, is forced to sell the old Babe Ruth artifacts that have been in the family for years.

Sixteen-year-old Ryan Buck is a talented athlete who was fortunate to escape with minor injuries from the horrific car crash that devastated his family. Two-and-a-half years and countless hours of therapy later, Ryan still can’t remember a thing about the accident and it’s making for agonizingly slow progress. But everything changes when his mom, Susan, is forced to sell the old Babe Ruth artifacts that have been in the family for years.

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Posted on March 24, 2013, in The Rest: Everything Baseball and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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