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An American Hobby: Baseball Memorabilia – ‘Mel Ott’ Card From 1935

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Sunday, March.24, 2013

Mel Ott was a Hall Of Fame Player that spent his whole Career wit the New York Giants.  He ranks 4th in ALL - Time HRs for players that played for just 1 team behind Schmidt (548), Mantle (536), and  Banks (512)

Mel Ott was a Hall Of Fame Player that spent his whole Career with the New York Giants. He ranks 4th in ALL – Time HRs for players that played for just 1 team behind Schmidt – PHI (548), Mickey Mantle – NYY (536), and Ernie Banks – CHC (512).   Ott made every ALL – Star Game (33 – ’44}.  He led the NL in Home Runs and Walk 6 times each.  Ott had 8 straight 100 + RBI years from Age 20 – 28.  At the Age of 20 (1929), he had his best year with 42 HRs, 151 RBI and a 3 Slash Line of .328/.449/1.084.

By Lee Edelstein (‘Baseball Memorabilia Enthusiast’ – visit his website here)

MLB Reports:  We are pleased to present you with Baseball Author Lee Edelstein as the newest writer with us at the Reports.  Lee will be providing us with great stories about baseball memorabilia on a regular basis.

MLB Reports

An American Hobby

Blog 6

Mel Ott

Collecting baseball cards is a uniquely American hobby.  As a kid growing up in the 1950’s I had shoeboxes full of them.  All of my friends did, too.  We had so many cards that, when we got older and our interests shifted to teenage pursuits, our moms decided to clean house. Literally.  Out went the cards which they considered to be nothing more than junk.  Today, we wax nostalgic over those cardboard canvasses of our heroes that we treated so casually.  That’s also why, in good condition, they are worth small fortunes.

I renewed my interest in card collecting a few years ago when I decided to build a collection of the elites of the game – the ballplayers who are members of three very exclusive clubs: 300 Wins, 3,000 Hits, and 500 Home Runs.  It’s an exclusive membership that includes players from before the turn of the twentieth century (Kid Nichols #7 with 361 wins) through players who are active today (Derek Jeter is currently #10 on the all-time hit list with 3,304 hits):

  • 300 Wins – 24 players
  • 3,000 Hits – 28 players          
  • 500 Home Runs – 25 players

Each week, I’ll feature a baseball card of one of these all-time greats.  Along the way, we’ll talk about other aspects of America’s Hobby, why it continues to grow in popularity, and answer any questions you may have.

1933 World Series Recap – Including a HR by Mel Ott!

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An American Hobby: Baseball Memorabilia – Honus Wagner: The Most Expensive Card Ever

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Saturday, March.09, 2013

Honus Wagner was an 8 time Batting Average Champion - who was a Doubles  (643, 9th ALL - Time) and Triples (252, 3rd ALL-Time) Machine.  He also Stole 723 Bases (10th ALL - Time)..  He is ranked as the #4 Hitter in the history of baseball by baseballreference.com (Ruth, Mays and Williams Top 3)

Honus Wagner was an 8 time Batting Average Champion – who was a Doubles (643, 9th ALL – Time) and Triples (252, 3rd ALL-Time) Machine. He Stole 723 Bases (10th ALL – Time).. He is ranked as the #4 Hitter in the history of baseball by baseballreference.com (Ruth, Mays and Williams Top 3).

By Lee Edelstein (‘Baseball MemorabiliaEnthusiast’ – visit his website here)

MLB Reports:  We are pleased to present you with Baseball Author Lee Edelstein as the newest writer with us at the Reports.  Lee will be providing us with great stories about baseball memorabilia on a regular basis.

MLB Reports

An American Hobby

Blog 4

Honus Wagner

Flipping Over Cards – The T206 Wagner The Most Expensive Card of All

As a kid I wasn’t much of a ballplayer, but when it came to collecting baseball cards I was an All-Star.  As a matter of fact, over half a century later, I still collect them.  Of course, the hobby has changed a bit over the years.

For a five-year period, from 1954-58, baseball cards were the most important thing in my life.  As winter turned to spring training, I, along with most of my friends, would bug our parents to take us to the candy store, to see if the Topps cards for the upcoming season had arrived.  Each year, those first cards, sealed in that season’s unique wax pack wrapper, were objects of unbearable anticipation.   

I would arrange my new stack of cards in numerical order, tossing the duplicates into a separate pile.  A few minutes admiring the pictures of the players, a rubber band wound tightly around them to secure my precious items, and off I went to catch up with my friends to compare, trade from my pile of duplicates, and flip. We’d attach triplicates to the spokes of our bicycle wheels so that they sounded like full-throated motorcycles as we sped down the street.  As the baseball season progressed, our piles got large enough that we employed shoe boxes to store our cache.

Wagner T206 Card mystery video

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