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I Give The Captain More Accolades: Jeter To Play Last Game In The Bronx + Last Series In Boston

derek jeter

Chuck Booth (Owner/Lead/Analyst – with assist to Jonathan Hacohen, Website Founder) 

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I understand the “Jeter Fatigue” that has gone on all year, and half of me just wishes that he never mentioned that he was done after the 2014 campaign.  I just hate giving any ammunition to the ‘hater’s’, and definitely when I have agreed it was overkill at some points.  

But then I would have missed his brilliant series at Safeco Field, that was worth the price of admission, if I hadn’t known it was his last year.

While he has struggled for some of this season, he had hits in his 1st AB, all three games of that series I attended, and reached base 9 times in 3 straight Yankee wins, giving me yet more memories for my favorite current Pinstriper.

I was there in person for that, and bought my only t-shirt of the year from a street vendor afterwards.

While everyone is not a Yankees fan. and are growing tired of the talk, this is the greatest Yankees player in my years of watching the sport. So, because I have a forum to write about him, Damnit I will!!

Sure I had grown up on Don Mattingly  (the last captain of the team prior to #2).. Heck…he is still my favorite player of ALL – Time, but Jeter came into the mix about the same time I graduated from high school.

I am sure I can say this about a lot of “Bronx Bombers’ fans my age.  I wanted to be a New York Yankee while playing organized baseball.  It was my dream.

Derek Jeter has lived the life all of us would have wanted as a Yankee Stadium ‘hero’. Read the rest of this entry

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Mike Jacobs: Rockies Slugger Receives 50 Game HGH Suspension

Friday August 19, 2011

 

 

MLB reports:  Major League Baseball commenced human growth hormone (“HGH”) testing in the minor leagues in the summer of 2010.  It was only a matter of time before players began to get caught under the new system.  Blood testing for HGH in the minors was the first step in bringing similar tests to the major leagues one day.  With HGH testing now in place as part of the NFL’s new collective bargaining agreement, MLB cannot be far behind.  With baseball’s agreement with the union set to expire in December of this year, expect HGH testing to be a big topic on the bargaining table.  The first player to be caught in the minors using HGH and receiving a 50 game suspension is Colorado Rockies slugger, Mike Jacobs.  With the first HGH culprit found, pressure will be intense on baseball to bring similar testing all the way to the major leagues.

Mike Jacobs will forever be known as the first North American athlete to test positive for HGH.  Although HGH suspensions have occurred internationally, Jacobs is the first athlete in a professional North American athlete to be tested and fail a HGH test.  Things should have gone differently for Jacobs in his career.  Originally a 38th round pick for the Mets in the 1999 draft, Jacobs rose from baseball obscurity to star with the Marlins from 2006-2008.  Here is a look at Jacobs’ major league stats: 

Year 5 Tm R HR RBI SO BA OBP SLG
2005 NYM 19 11 23 22 .310 .375 .710
2006 FLA 54 20 77 105 .262 .325 .473
2007 FLA 57 17 54 101 .265 .317 .458
2008 FLA 67 32 93 119 .247 .299 .514
2009 KCR 46 19 61 132 .228 .297 .401
2010 NYM 1 1 2 7 .208 .296 .375
6 Seasons 244 100 310 486 .253 .313 .475
162 Game Avg. 71 29 90 142 .253 .313 .475
               
FLA (3 yrs) 178 69 224 325 .258 .314 .483
NYM (2 yrs) 20 12 25 29 .290 .360 .645
KCR (1 yr) 46 19 61 132 .228 .297 .401
               
NL (5 yrs) 198 81 249 354 .261 .317 .496
AL (1 yr) 46 19 61 132 .228 .297 .401

 

2008 represented the best season of Jacobs’ career.  He hit 32 home runs, to go along with 93 RBIs for the Marlins.  But despite the strong power numbers, critics pointed to his .247 AVG and weak .299 OBP that year and labelled him a one-dimensional player.  The Marlins agreed and traded Jacobs in October 2008 for current closer Leo Nunez.  Jacobs originally joined the Marlins in November 2005 as a package of players for superstar Carlos Delgaldo.  Big expectations were placed on Jacobs to replace Delgaldo ever since he joined the Marlins.  While Jacobs had the strong power numbers in 2008, the team ultimately was not convinced that he would ever fulfill his potential.  While Nunez went on to star in the Marlins bullpen, Jacobs lasted only one season in Kansas City, his last full season in the big leagues.

In 2010, Jacobs spent parts of the year playing in the Mets and Blue Jays farm systems.  He hit 21 home runs and drove in 93 in 120 games combined in AAA, with a .335 OBP and .482 SLG.  This season, Jacobs played exclusively in Colorado Springs and put up inflated numbers in the hitting friendly Pacific Coast League.  With 23 home runs in 117 games, 97 RBIs, .376 OBP and .534 SLG, there looked to be a chance for Jacobs to restart his major league career.  At 30-years of age, Jacobs was looking to have a year-end cup of coffee with the Rockies and leave a strong enough impression to perhaps have a chance in spring training 2012.  Reports had a call up imminent for Jacobs when news of the HGH positive test leaked out.  The Rockies immediately released the slugger, who is now on the MLB sidelines. 

Following the Marlins acquisition of Jacobs in 2005, I expected his career to develop differently.  It was clear the power was going to be there.   It was the rest of his hitting development that I expect to follow.  To stay in the big leagues, Jacobs was going to need to learn patience and to hit lefties.  Following his 2008 campaign, I still hoped in the back of my mind that those qualities would eventually come out.  But they never in fact did.  Looking back at his magical 2008 campaign, there were red flags that Jacobs had major shortcomings as a hitter.  25 of his home runs came against right-handed pitchers.  Against lefties, Jacobs hit .218 with a .248 OBP and .429 SLG.  At best, without improvement, Jacobs was likely destined to be a platoon player for the rest of his career.  Now today, Jacobs stands as the new poster child for HGH cheating.  A scarlet letter that will be difficult, if not impossible to remove.

With Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire and Rafael Palmeiro gone from the game and the “steroid era” at an apparent end, the focus is now on HGH.  Apparently very wide-spread in the game, baseball officials are said to be taking a hard stance to remove HGH use from the game.  In suspending Jacobs, commissioner Selig indicated that baseball is on top of testing and is not hiding from the process.  I expect HGH testing to be a part of the major leagues as early as 2012.  Despite the tests and the threat of strict penalties, as Mike Jacobs has shown, athletes will continue to try to get ahead despite the risks involved.  Jacobs came clean following his positive test, admitting usage to overcome injuries and regretting his decision to use HGH.  The decision to use HGH will cost Jacobs more than 50 games.  It resulted in his dismissal from the Rockies and likely removal from major league baseball all together.  For a fringe player that was already hanging by a thread, having the HGH suspension on his resume will scare off many, if not most major league teams.

Mike Jacobs had his chances in baseball.  While many sluggers before him are lucky to get one shot at the big leagues, Jacobs had several chances.  Despite playing for three teams over six major league seasons, Mike Jacobs was never able to fulfill his vast potential.  Like many left-handed home run hitters, Jacobs could never hit well against lefties and get on base at a high enough level to compliment his power bat.  Now at 30-years of age, the legacy of Mike Jacobs will be as using HGH and failing the first North American test.  While I expected Jacobs to be fighting for home run crowns at this point in his career, he now sits outside of baseball.  A lesson to be learned for future sluggers.  It is better to play clean and keep your reputation than cheat and get caught.  Once the first failed test hits, any accomplishments in the past and future will always be tarnished.  As Palmeiro, Bonds, Sosa and McGwire can attest, poor public perceptions never seem to go away.  They just continue to linger, seemingly until the end of time.   

 

 

 

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Derek Jeter: New York Yankees Captain Joins the 3000 Hit Club

Saturday  July 9, 2011

 

 

MLB reports:   Only in New York.  Derek Jeter entered today’s play with 2,998 career hits.  Only two hits short of the magical 3,000 mark.  Up against tough lefty pitcher David Price of the Rays, there was no certainty that Jeter would achieve the mark today.  But this being Jeter, playing in New York in front of the Yankees faithful, you knew that the captain would not disappoint.  Jeter ended up putting on a show for the ages today that few will ever forget and cementing his place in history as one of the best Yankees of all time.

Jeter started off the afternoon with a lead-off single.  Coming up in the 3rd inning, one hit away from 3,000, Jeter took David Price deep for a home run.  The captain hit out of the park in every sense of the word.  After celebrating the accomplishment, Jeter proceeded to have three more hits and finish the day a perfect 5 for 5.  Jeter is only the second player ever to get five hits in getting to 3,000, Craig Biggio being the other in 2007.

 

To put this into perspective, let’s take a look at the exclusive 3,000 Hit Club that Derek Jeter has just joined:

Player

Hits

Average

Date

Team

 

 

 

Pete Rose

4,256

.303

May 5, 1978

Cincinnati Reds

 

 

 

Ty Cobb

4,191

.366

August 19, 1921

Detroit Tigers

 

 

 

Hank Aaron

3,771

.305

May 17, 1970

Atlanta Braves

 

 

 

Stan Musial

3,630

.331

May 13, 1958

St. Louis Cardinals

 

 

 

Tris Speaker

3,514

.345

May 17, 1925

Cleveland Indians

 

 

 

Carl Yastrzemski

3,419

.285

September 12, 1979

Boston Red Sox

 

 

 

Cap Anson

3,012

.334

July 18, 1897

Chicago Colts

 

 

 

Honus Wagner

3,415

.328

June 9, 1914

Pittsburgh Pirates

 

 

 

Paul Molitor

3,319

.306

September 16, 1996

Minnesota Twins

 

 

 

Eddie Collins

3,315

.333

June 6, 1925

Chicago White Sox

 

 

 

Willie Mays

3,283

.302

July 18, 1970

San Francisco Giants

 

 

 

Eddie Murray

3,255

.287

June 30, 1995

Cleveland Indians

 

 

 

Nap Lajoie

3,242

.338

September 27, 1914

Cleveland Naps

 

 

 

Cal Ripken, Jr.

3,184

.276

April 15, 2000

Baltimore Orioles

 

 

 

George Brett

3,154

.305

September 30, 1992

Kansas City Royals

 

 

 

Paul Waner

3,152

.333

June 19, 1942

Boston Braves

 

 

 

Robin Yount

3,142

.285

September 9, 1992

Milwaukee Brewers

 

 

 

Tony Gwynn

3,141

.338

August 6, 1999

San Diego Padres

 

 

 

Dave Winfield

3,110

.283

September 16, 1993

Minnesota Twins

 

 

 

Craig Biggio

3,060

.281

June 28, 2007

Houston Astros

 

 

 

Rickey Henderson

3,055

.279

October 7, 2001

San Diego Padres

 

 

 

Rod Carew

3,053

.328

August 4, 1985

California Angels

 

 

 

Lou Brock

3,023

.293

August 13, 1979

St. Louis Cardinals

 

 

 

Rafael Palmeiro

3,020

.288

July 15, 2005

Baltimore Orioles

 

 

 

Wade Boggs

3,010

.328

August 7, 1999

Tampa Bay Devil Rays

 

 

 

Al Kaline

3,007

.297

September 24, 1974

Detroit Tigers

 

 

 

Derek Jeter

3,003

.312

July 9, 2011

New York Yankees

 

 

 

Roberto Clemente

3,000

.317

September 30, 1972

Pittsburgh Pirates

 

 

 

 

Derek Jeter is only the 28th player in MLB history to reach 3,000 hits.  An incredible feat indeed.  To put it further into perspective, every member of the 3,000 Hit Club is in the Baseball Hall of Fame, with the exception of Biggio (not yet eligible), Jeter (active), and Palmeiro/Rose (steroids, gambling).  With 3,000 hits, a player almost guarantees his entrance to the Hall.  With the exception of Rose and Palmeiro, every member of the 3,000 Hit Club has been a first ballot HOFer since 1962.  Jeter certainly deserves all the attention that he is receiving today.  Not only did he reach the mark, but he did it on baseball’s stage in the true style of a superstar.

 

Looking at Derek Jeter’s career numbers, the man has definitely proven to be one of the game’s greats:

Year AB R H HR RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1995 48 5 12 0 7 3 11 .250 .294 .375 .669
1996 582 104 183 10 78 48 102 .314 .370 .430 .800
1997 654 116 190 10 70 74 125 .291 .370 .405 .775
1998 626 127 203 19 84 57 119 .324 .384 .481 .864
1999 627 134 219 24 102 91 116 .349 .438 .552 .989
2000 593 119 201 15 73 68 99 .339 .416 .481 .896
2001 614 110 191 21 74 56 99 .311 .377 .480 .858
2002 644 124 191 18 75 73 114 .297 .373 .421 .794
2003 482 87 156 10 52 43 88 .324 .393 .450 .844
2004 643 111 188 23 78 46 99 .292 .352 .471 .823
2005 654 122 202 19 70 77 117 .309 .389 .450 .839
2006 623 118 214 14 97 69 102 .343 .417 .483 .900
2007 639 102 206 12 73 56 100 .322 .388 .452 .840
2008 596 88 179 11 69 52 85 .300 .363 .408 .771
2009 634 107 212 18 66 72 90 .334 .406 .465 .871
2010 663 111 179 10 67 63 106 .270 .340 .370 .710
2011 280 40 72 2 22 24 33 .257 .321 .329 .649
17 Seasons 9602 1725 2998 236 1157 972 1605 .312 .383 .449 .832
162 Game Avg. 659 118 206 16 79 67 110 .312 .383 .449 .832
  AB R H HR RBI BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
 

Derek Jeter, also known as Mr. November or Captain Clutch, has enjoyed a storybook career.  AL ROY in 1996, five gold gloves, 11 All-Star game appearances, a World Series MVP and All-Star game MVP,  4 Silver Slugger awards, 4 World Series rings…the list goes on and on.  For a man who grew up cheering for the Yankees, Jeter will one day have his plaque in Cooperstown and jersey retired in Yankee Stadium.  Although clearly on the decline at age 37, which started to show rapidly last year, Jeter proved today that he still has some big hits left in his bat.  Congrats to Yankee captain Derek Jeter, or as he will be known from now on, Mr. 3000. 

 

 

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Manny Ramirez: The End of a Nightmare

MLB reports:  As a fan, analyst and writer of baseball, I rarely take pleasure in the misery of others.  Some of my readers would point to Vernon Wells and my “Vernon Watch” in what I commonly refer to as a showcase of blundery.  But Vernon is the exception to the rule.  For the most part, players are athletes that train hard, play with heart and hustle and give it their all on the playing field.  With the career of Manny Ramirez unceremoniously coming to a halt yesterday, there is an overwhelming sense of relief and enjoyment around baseball circles today.  For a man who could hit baseballs like flew other, one of the greatest hitters in MLB history will go down in the baseball archives as a laughingstock and side-show act.  A shame when one looks at the statistics and career of Manny Ramirez.  But for a man who got one too many chances, the punishment fits the crime.  Today we say goodbye to a distraction and one less black eye for the glorious game of baseball.

 

The first questions most MLB fans asked me yesterday was whether Manny deserves to go into the hall of fame?  My answer is simple.  In my opinion, if I had a vote, a definite yes.  Regardless of what Manny took or didn’t take, his statistics speak for themselves.  There have been many drug cheats and cheaters of all kind in baseball over the years.  The bottom line is that not many match to Manny’s outstanding numbers.  But alas I do not have a vote to-date and from what the baseball writers have shown in recent voting history with McGwire and Palmeiro, Ramirez won’t so much as get as much a sniff of the hall.  I can see the arguments for keeping Ramirez out of the hall.  Based on his second failed drug test and choice to retire and run over facing the music cements a legacy of being a quitter and a coward.  Manny gave up on the Red Sox and the Dodgers and got run out-of-town in each instance.  A first failed drug test blamed on some sort of hormone substances.  With a second failed test, Manny decided to take his glove and go home, rather than face the music.  I cannot see fans, let alone baseball writers forgiving him for this decision.  But again fitting for a man who has made a career of bad decisions and turning his back on the game one too many times.

 

Where does the future now lie for Manny Ramirez?  Many ex-players have the option of going into scouting, managing, broadcasting, writing….the field is wide open.  Mark McGwire, got a job as the hitting coach for the St. Louis Cardinals, but as part of the requirement McGwire had to go on national television and give his apology.  Sort of.  But McGwire always had the eye of the public for his strong image and was somewhat cut some slack by the public.  Manny, with his quirky and aloof personality has a better chance of becoming President of the United States than a baseball coach, manager or broadcaster.  Seen as a liability, Manny is now headed into a self-imposed baseball exile, joining the likes of Sammy Sosa, Rafael Palmeiro and Barry Bonds as the baseball steroids/ped’s outcasts.  I could envision a day where Manny will write a tell-all book, explaining his side of “the story” while outing ex-friends and teammates in the process.  Manny just seems to be one of those guys, concerned more about himself and the almighty dollar than anything else.

 

When we all think to Manny Ramirez in ten years time, we will think of an idiot.  That will be the image in our minds.  Not the young rookie sensation on the Indians, World Series champ for the Red Sox, dreadlocks #99 igniter on the Dodgers or a two-bit player on the White Sox and Rays.  The man who chose to instantly retire rather than face his due punishment.  When faced with his first suspension last year, Manny did not speak to the media the entire balance of the season.  He is that kind of guy.  I did not imagine for the life of me in the offseason that any team would take a chance on him.  In my estimation, Manny was best served going away gracefully at the end of 2010 rather than being one last thorn in the side of an undeserving team.  When the Rays signed Manny, I said publicly that this could only end bad and that he would not last the season.  Rather than being dumped in August, Manny barely survived a week into 2011.  A 1-17 start at the plate will be the final blemish on an otherwise exceptional statistical career.  But as hall of fame voters are now showing, votes go beyond the numbers.  Manny Ramirez in the twilight of his career has been essentially a nightmare for all those involved with him.  Staring today, the nightmare is over.  Baseball does not need or want the Manny Ramirez’s of this world and my hope is that after this latest horror show, baseball will not see another Manny for a long time.  Baseball is built on hustle, teamwork, determination and heart.  Four words that were not in Manny’s vocabulary and for that transgression, we finally say goodbye to Manny for the last time. 

 

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