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An American Hobby: Baseball Memorabilia – Honus Wagner: The Most Expensive Card Ever

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Saturday, March.09, 2013

Honus Wagner was an 8 time Batting Average Champion - who was a Doubles  (643, 9th ALL - Time) and Triples (252, 3rd ALL-Time) Machine.  He also Stole 723 Bases (10th ALL - Time)..  He is ranked as the #4 Hitter in the history of baseball by baseballreference.com (Ruth, Mays and Williams Top 3)

Honus Wagner was an 8 time Batting Average Champion – who was a Doubles (643, 9th ALL – Time) and Triples (252, 3rd ALL-Time) Machine. He Stole 723 Bases (10th ALL – Time).. He is ranked as the #4 Hitter in the history of baseball by baseballreference.com (Ruth, Mays and Williams Top 3).

By Lee Edelstein (‘Baseball MemorabiliaEnthusiast’ – visit his website here)

MLB Reports:  We are pleased to present you with Baseball Author Lee Edelstein as the newest writer with us at the Reports.  Lee will be providing us with great stories about baseball memorabilia on a regular basis.

MLB Reports

An American Hobby

Blog 4

Honus Wagner

Flipping Over Cards – The T206 Wagner The Most Expensive Card of All

As a kid I wasn’t much of a ballplayer, but when it came to collecting baseball cards I was an All-Star.  As a matter of fact, over half a century later, I still collect them.  Of course, the hobby has changed a bit over the years.

For a five-year period, from 1954-58, baseball cards were the most important thing in my life.  As winter turned to spring training, I, along with most of my friends, would bug our parents to take us to the candy store, to see if the Topps cards for the upcoming season had arrived.  Each year, those first cards, sealed in that season’s unique wax pack wrapper, were objects of unbearable anticipation.   

I would arrange my new stack of cards in numerical order, tossing the duplicates into a separate pile.  A few minutes admiring the pictures of the players, a rubber band wound tightly around them to secure my precious items, and off I went to catch up with my friends to compare, trade from my pile of duplicates, and flip. We’d attach triplicates to the spokes of our bicycle wheels so that they sounded like full-throated motorcycles as we sped down the street.  As the baseball season progressed, our piles got large enough that we employed shoe boxes to store our cache.

Wagner T206 Card mystery video

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Roger Clemens: A Cardboard God Comes Into Focus

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Saturday, January.12, 2013

The picture stands today as the symbol of an era -- and innocence -- lost.

The Topps 1987 Card.

By Saul Wisnia,  Red Sox Correspondent (Read his blog ‘Fenway Reflections’ here):

I took the photo in Cooperstown, after driving from Boston to baseball’s Mayberry with three buddies for my first look at the game’s red-bricked shrine. When we entered the Hall of Fame Plaque Gallery, just off the museum’s lobby, I instinctively knew which of the immortals I wanted to visit first. Walking through the years to the 1966 induction class, I found him on the wall right alongside Casey Stengel:

The picture stands today as the symbol of an era — and innocence — lost. In it, Roger Clemens and Ted Williams share confident, youthful smiles. Williams is, quite literally, a bronzed God, staring out at the photographer in his tanned, All-American glory. Clemens, wearing a fresh, clean Red Sox uniform, also has the look of a man who knows exactly what he wants out of life.

Williams yearned to be the world’s greatest hitter; Clemens the top pitcher. At the time of the picture, in 1988, both had reached their goal.

Ted Williams Tribute Piece from 2002:

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