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Master List Of All Free Agents Signed In 2013 Winter – Heading Into 2014 MLB Year

Hunter Stokes (Chief Writer): 

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It has been a record setting year for contract $ doled out for players.  When you factor in the player extensions, we are talking about 7 contracts registering in the top 50 Player contracts in the history of the game.

Robinson Cano, Clayton Kershaw, Masahiro Tanaka, Jacoby Ellsbury, Freddie Freeman, Shin-Soo Choo and Homer Bailey have inked deal for between $105 MIL to $240 MIL.

Now there is word the Angels are working on an extension with Mike Trout, to the tune of 6 YRs/$150 MIL,  from 2015 – 2020.  This would be the 22nd highest contract in MLB History.

For the record, Trout’s deal for 2014 is already set at $510 K, and any extension wouldn’t have Luxury Tax Ramifications until his new deal would start in 2015. Read the rest of this entry

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The Marlins Should Promote Christian Yelich Now

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Sunday, May 12th, 2013

After being ranked as the No. 1 prospect in the Marlins farm system by Baseball America coming into 2012,  Yelich hit .330 in High-A with a .922 OPS. Most scouting reports have him again as either the No. 1 or No. 2 prospect in the Marlins system.  Yelich cracked both Baseball America and Keith Law’s top 50 prospects coming into 2012 and by mid-season Yelich had jumped into Law’s top 15 prospects (No.12).  If Yelich can stick in centerfield, he could be a huge asset for the Marlins as they build a foundation around an outfield of Stanton, Yelich and Jake Marisnick, who was acquired in the Reyes deal. Yelich could offer a very steady compliment to Stanton as early as 2013 depending on his performance at Double-A . He is not a power hitter as of yet, but his body projects as one that can fill out over time and gain strength

“After being ranked as the No. 1 prospect in the Marlins farm system by Baseball America coming into 2012, Yelich hit .330 in High-A with a .922 OPS. Most scouting reports have him again as either the No. 1 or No. 2 prospect in the Marlins system. Yelich cracked both Baseball America and Keith Law’s top 50 prospects coming into 2012 and by mid-season Yelich had jumped into Law’s top 15 prospects (No.12). If he cmarcellan stick in centerfield, he could be a huge asset for the Marlins as they build a foundation around an outfield of Stanton, Yelich and Jake Marisnick, who was acquired in the Reyes deal. He could offer a very steady compliment to Stanton right now based on his performance at Double-A  He is not a power hitter as of yet, but his body projects as one that can fill out over time and gain strength.”  Nicholas Rossoletti – (MLB Reports Writer)

Sam Evans ( Baseball Writer and Marlins, Mariners Correspondent):

The Marlins have turned heads all over baseball for their controversial promotions of young, inexperienced prospects over the last couple months. So far, the clubs decisions couldn’t have turned out much better. Marcell Ozuna is holding back at the plate, and it’s led to 13 hits in 45 at bat’s in 11 games.

Jose Fernandez looks like a serious N.L. Rookie of the Year candidate with his 3.15 FIP in seven starts and 39 strikeouts in only 37 innings. So with these two top prospects shining at the Major League level, why wouldn’t the Marlins bring up another elite prospect that will keep fans coming to the ballpark and plays a position of need?

Christian Yelich has proven he’s ready for the Majors and the Marlins would be silly not to call him up in the next week or two.

Miami Marlins- Christian Yelich talks Spring Training 2013:

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Nate Freiman: Beane Finds Yet Another Hidden Gem… And The A’s Next 1st Baseman

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Friday April 5th, 2013

All Nate Freiman did was carry the Country of Israel during the recent World Baseball Classic Qualifying Tournament. Can this First Base giant do the same in Oakland?

All Nate Freiman did was carry the Country of Israel during the recent World Baseball Classic Qualifying Tournament. Can this First Base giant do the same in Oakland?

Jonathan Hacohen  (Lead Baseball Columnist, Oakland A’s Correspondent and Website Founder):  

Baseball is a funny game sometimes. One minute you’re crying the Chris Carter blues. Then before you  know it, Nate Freiman appears. That is how Billy Beane works my friends. Just when you think he might be slipping, he pulls a magic rabbit out of his hat (better known as the waiver wire in baseball terms). 

On February 11, 2013, I wrote an article outlining Billy Beane’s error in trading Chris Carter. While I have always endorsed the talents of Jed Lowrie, it was my opinion that giving up a future star in Chris Carter was too high of a price to pay.

The trade (which actually took place on February 4th) saw the Astros acquire yet another stud First Base prospect. I wondered out loud what the Astros would do with all their First Base talent (Brett Wallace, Jonathan Singleton, Nate Freiman and veteran Carlos Pena).

It seemed like too many bats and not enough positions in Houston, despite the newfound need for a Designated Hitter. A little over a month later, March 23rd to be exact- I had my answer. Nate Freiman was on his way to Oakland.

The star for Israel in this year’s World Baseball Classic qualifying tournament was going to get the opportunity of a lifetime.

While some felt the A’s were simply acquiring roster depth, I saw a different vision. The A’s had their replacement for Brandon Moss at First Base.

Billy Beane had an uncovered yet another gem that was going to thrive in Oakland. Remember Josh Reddick 2012? Meet Nate Freiman 2013.  

Nate Freiman Interview:

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Yoenis Cespedes: While Cuba Misses Their Star in the 2013 WBC – the A’s Slugger Looks to be an A.L. MVP Candidate

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Friday March 8th, 2013

From Cuba to A.L. MVP? Despite not being able to represent his native country in the WBC, Cespedes is a year older and wiser. The more he adjusts to North America life and baseball, opposing pitchers will shudder even more each time Cespedes comes to the plate.

Jonathan Hacohen  (Lead Baseball Columnist, Oakland A’s Correspondent and Website Founder):  

It’s pretty ironic if you ask me. The 2013 World Baseball Classic is here and Cuba is off to a huge start. I had to pick a winner and went with Cuba as my pre-tournament favorite. Considering that Japan has won both editions of the WBC, Cuba was definitely going to be in tough. To top it all off, they are starting off the first two rounds in Japan. Why is it ironic? For Cuba is missing its biggest star for the tournament. Yoenis Cespedes, the Oakland A’s star outfielder is in Arizona for Spring Training.

Far away from the bright lights of Japan, where Cuba finally beat its nemesis this week in WBC play after several failed attempts in the past. With that monkey off their back, Cuba has made the statement that they are ready to win it all. But yet without their biggest star. For when one defects from Cuba, they are forever banished from representing their country again in any baseball capacity.

I couldn’t help but think watching Cuba play in Japan this week that in fact Cespedes and the A’s opened their season last year in Japan. Cespedes actually started off his season with a bang out there and never looked back. On March 29th last year, Cespedes had a home run in the 2nd game of the A’s young season. That bomb in Japan was the start of the legend. Who knew that Cespedes would actually be in Japan a year too early? For all the success that Cuba has enjoyed thus far in the 2013 WBC, imagine if they had Cespedes anchoring that lineup?

Cuba may very still win the 2013 WBC. My money is on that happening. But if Cuba falls short yet again, the what if scenarios will endlessly get bounced around. What if the team had Aroldis Chapman? Alexei Ramirez? And most of all, Yoenis Cespedes? Until Cuba allows its defectors to come home again, the talent drain will continue to affect the country in international tournaments.

Yoenis Cespedes 2012 Highlights Mature Lyrics so Parental Guidance is Advised:

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An Interview With Baseball Superfan And Photographer Jill Marie Workman

Thursday, December.13/2012

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Chuck Booth (Lead Baseball Writer/Website Owner):

I recently had the privilege to meet Jill Workman on Twitter through a mutual friend.  We started talking about love for the game of baseball and sharing war stories of fandom.  I was extremely impressed with Jill’s devotion to baseball photography.  I think the MLB Fans have a certain rabidness towards the game that is both encompassing and inspirational.  That Jill will spend countless hours, at great individual cost, in order to ply her hobby as a photographer, represents the aforementioned qualities I just spoke of.  After filtering through thousands of her pictures, I wanted the whole baseball community (including our readers) to see her fine work.  I am glad that Jill agreed to do this interview.  There is always a place on this website to express the passionate people who make the MLB the best fans in the World! Read the rest of this entry

Moises Sierra Has a Future in the Majors: A Blue Jays Work in Progress

Sunday August 26th, 2012

Sam Evans: When Toronto Blue Jays GM Alex Anthopoulos traded away both Travis Snider and Eric Thames at the trade deadline, it created an opportunity for unheralded twenty-three year old outfielder Moises Sierra. Sierra has a chance to show Toronto that he should be part of their future in these final couple months of the season. With his 70-grade arm and his ability to produce runs at a solid pace, Sierra could have a job in the majors for years to come. However, Sierra has a lot of work to do to become a candidate for playing time at Rogers Centre in 2013.

Moises Sierra was signed by the Blue Jays out of the Dominican Republic back in 2005. This was before the Blue Jays dominated the scouting world, so Sierra has never been an “Anthopoulos guy”. From 2006 to 2008, Sierra had some rough numbers for different teams, but he showed enough to be promoted from the DSL, in 2006, to earning a starting job in High-A for the 2009 season. Sierra had a 122 wRC+ at High-A in 2009, but he missed most of the 2010 season due to a stress fracture in his leg and a couple of other minor injuries. Read the rest of this entry

Top 5 Center Field Prospects in Baseball

Saturday August 25th, 2012

Codey Harrison: (Lead MiLB Prospect Analyst) - Today represents the final installment of the three-part series featuring middle of the field positions. The most important outfield position usually is played by the team’s most athletic position player has seen some big stars come into the big leagues in recent years. With the likes of Matt Kemp, Andrew McCutchen, Mike Trout, Adam Jones, and Austin Jackson the center field position has grown from a defensive minded position, into one that includes some of the games biggest superstars. The current minor league crop of center fielder’s is a very solid group which is led by 2011 first round pick Bubba Starling of the Kansas City Royals organization.

1.) Bubba Starling (Kansas City Royals Rookie Lg) - The 6’4″ 180 pound former University of Nebraska quarterback commitment has it all in terms of abilities on a baseball field. The fifth overall pick in the 2011 draft out of Gardner Kansas has drawn comparisons to Cincinnati Reds center fielder Drew Stubbs, the only difference is that scouts see Starling as a much better pure hitter than Stubbs. In his first pro season, it’s pretty evident that Starling is still very raw as a baseball prospect, as he began this season with Rookie League Burlington at 20 years of age. In his first 50 career games, Starling has shown off all of his tools as he is currently batting .282, with a .379 OBP, .505 SLG, with 10 home runs, and 10 stolen bases. The Royals are already loaded with young hitting studs like Eric Hosmer, Mike Moustakas, Billy Butler, Wil Myers. With Bubba Starling, the Royals should be one of the AL’s premier offenses within the next 3-4 years. Read the rest of this entry

The Underrated Greatness of Yoenis Cespedes: The Stats Don’t Lie

Monday August 20th, 2012

                                                                                                                                

                                                                              (Image Courtesy of Businessinsider.com)

Jonathan Hacohen: For all the talk of Mike Trout as the sure bet for this year’s A.L. ROY and possibly MVP awards, a name that does not get thrown around enough is that of Yoenis Cespedes. Heard of him? I’m sure you have. The Cuban sensation, who went almost overnight from a YouTube prospect star to the A’s best hitter. The baseball world has not forgotten about Cespedes. But it seems like for all the attention Mike Trout is getting, Cespedes is not getting enough baseball love. Given Trout’s numbers, it’s not hard to see why. The kid hailed as the next Mickey Mantle has delivered and then some. Trout leads the league with a .343 average. Scored 96 runs and stole 39 bases. Obscene numbers for any MLB player in August, let alone a 21-year old. What makes Trout even more incredible is that he is doing it at home and on the road. Check his splits- almost identical. But then Trout does get to enjoy the lineup protection of Albert Pujols, Kendrys Morales, Torii Hunter and the rest of the Angels lineup. 

I am not even going to begin to try to compare Trout and Cespedes. Apples and oranges. Trout is much younger (6 years) and he clearly has the superior numbers. In any other year though, Yoenis Cespedes would have been the shoo-in Rookie of the Year in the A.L. and would have garnered MVP votes as well. But just because Trout is so good, we shouldn’t let Cespedes not get his time in the sun. The man has been a one-man wrecking crew for the A’s and the team’s overall record with him in the lineup is part of the proof of his greatness. Read the rest of this entry

Weekly 6-Pack MiLB Prospects Hot/Cold Sheet- Week of August 20th (Pitchers Edition)

Sunday August 19th, 2012

Codey Harrison (Lead MiLB Prospect Analyst):  We are back  this week with the weekly prospect hot/cold sheet, this week we will feature starting pitchers. First, We will feature 3 pitching prospects that are on fire, and 3 pitching prospects that are ice-cold. Our list of players will only include those who are still prospect eligible (less than 50 innings pitched at the MLB level). Featured players are generally players who are highly regarded amongst the minors and are regarded as legit prospects. Gaining our ranking as the hottest prospect of the week is Pirates prospect Gerrit Cole, who is starting to show the impressive strikeout numbers scouts have been waiting to see from the 2011 number one overall draft pick.

HOT PROSPECTS

Gerrit Cole (Pirates AA) - The 6 foot 4 Cole is everything scouts look to find in a starting pitcher. Gerrit Cole posses the size, strength, and power stuff that have most scouts believing Cole can become an Ace. A fastball that sits 94-97 MPH, and occasionally touches 100 MPH rates as the top pitch for the very talented righty from UCLA. Cole has recently been putting up the dominant walk/strikeout numbers scouts have been waiting to see from the Pirates prized prospect, which has led to Cole being the feature hot prospect this week. With AA Altoona Cole has gone 11 1/3 innings,  6 hits, 2 runs (1ER), while only walking 3, and striking out 15 in his last 2 starts. In his first full pro season Cole has posted numbers that make it very clear why the Pirates where unwilling to trade Cole, or his new AA teammate Jameson Taillon. Read the rest of this entry

Top 5 Catching Prospects in Baseball

Friday August 17th, 2012

Codey Harrison (Lead MiLB Prospect Analyst) – The second installment of a 3-part series featuring the top 5 prospects from middle of the field positions. This week we are focusing on one of the hardest positions in all of baseball to find superstars at. One of the biggest reasons is that catchers take a lot longer to progress defensively than any other position in baseball. Bryce Harper who was known for being a catcher in high school was drafted as an outfielder by the Nationals so he could make it to the Major Leagues much faster. Being able to call a game behind the plate, and knowing the angles that are needed to block pitches in the dirt can take several years to master. The wear and tear on a catcher can be a vigorous one, as most catchers only catch 140 games an entire season even if they are healthy the entire season. With current catchers in MLB who are stars like Joe Mauer, Matt Wieters, Buster Posey, Brian McCann, Yadier Molina, and Miguel Montero, it’s time to take a look at the potential future catching stars who replace the current MLB All-Star catchers. Plus teams look to move star catchers from their primary position to save their bats and extend their careers in the process.


Travis d’Arnaud (Toronto Blue Jays AAA) - Travis d’Arnaud was the prize prospect along with RHP Kyle Drabek the Blue Jays acquired in the Roy Halladay trade. d’Arnaud was named the 2011 Eastern League best catcher by the leagues managers. For the position, d’Arnaud has plenty of future plus tools (Hit, Power, Arm, and Fielding), and is on pace to supplant current Blue Jays catcher J.P. Arencibia by the start of the 2013 season. d’Arnaud is currently on the disabled list, but for the season with AAA Las Vegas he’s batting .333, .380 OBP, .595 SLG, with 16 home runs, and 52 RBIs. One of the very few things scouts are drawn away from d’Arnaud is his approach at the plate, as he is very aggressive having walked on 19 times, while striking out 59 times on the season. Read the rest of this entry

The MiLB Player and Pitcher of the Month for July 2012

Sunday August 5th, 2012

Codey Harrison: In an effort to bring you the excitement of the minor leagues’ best players and how well they are performing on the field, we are introducing a monthly minor league players of the month feature. From the very well-known prospects, to the not so well-known: if they are raking at the plate, or dominating on the mound for an entire month, they have a chance of winning our monthly honor. Now it’s time to find out who we feel dominated the MiLB in the month of July:

MiLB PITCHER OF THE MONTH:  JULY 2012 Read the rest of this entry

2012 Mid-Season MLB Top-50 Prospects

Saturday July 21st, 2012


Codey Harrison:  A Texas Rangers shortstop prospect tops our list of the top-50 MLB prospects. Jurickson Profar is so highly thought of by scouts, that they believe the Rangers may end up trading 23-year-old 2-time All-star shortstop, Elvis Andrus. Profar has all five tools (hit, power, speed, glove, and arm) and he’s proven he knows how to use all five. He’s currently raking in AA Frisco at only 19 years of age, posting monstrous numbers of .297 AVG, .371 OBP, .500 Slug, 22 doubles, 7 triples, 12 home runs, and 44 walks to 59 strikeouts. Most believe he will be a gold glove caliber top, or middle of the order run producing machine that is a perennial All-Star. Time will tell on this prospect. But in a minor leagues full of “can’t miss” prospects, Profar gets out top vote at this stage of the season.

This list of the 2012 mid-season MLB Top-50 prospects does not include 2012 first year player draft players. Only players with less than 130 ABs, or 50 IP at the major league level qualify. All stats are 2012 MiLB stats as of 7/21/12:

  1. SS – Jurickson Profar (AA Rangers) .297/.371/.500, 12 HR, 10 SB
  2. RHP –  Dylan Bundy (A+ Orioles) 5-3, 1.74 ERA, 72.1 IP, 88K
  3. OF – Wil Myers (AAA Royals) .317/.396/.654, 28 HR, 5 SB
  4. SS – Manny Machado (AA Orioles) .257/.343/.410, 8 HR, 12 SB
  5. RHP – Gerrit Cole (AA Pirates) 7-4, 3.07 ERA, 88 IP, 90 K Read the rest of this entry

Lars Anderson Needs a New Team: Red Sox Prospect Slowly Turning into a Suspect

Friday July 6th, 2012

Sam Evans:  Red Sox prospect Lars Anderson went from being an 18th round draft pick, to being in-line for a starting spot on one of the most storied teams in baseball. However, after the Red Sox signed Adrian Gonzalez, Anderson no longer was part of the Red Sox future. Now, in Triple-A, Anderson needs a new team that believes in him. After all, he’s only twenty-four years old and just a step away from the majors.

Lars Anderson was drafted in the 18th round of the 2006 MLB Amateur, draft mainly because teams thought he wouldn’t sway from a commitment to the University of California-Berkley. However, the Red Sox went way over slot to sign Anderson handing him a $825,000 signing bonus. $825,000 was a lot for a second-round draft pick, let alone an eighteenth rounder. Pretty soon, Red Sox nation got excited about this young first baseman/outfielder and his seemingly bright future. Read the rest of this entry

Reds Prospect on the Rise: Billy Hamilton is on the Verge of Greatness

Sunday May 13th, 2012

Photo Courtesy of Giants fan: Crystal Ramos

Sam Evans: Billy Hamilton is one of the most discussed players in the minor leagues. He might be the fastest player in baseball, but the rest of his game is far from finished. Reds fans probably won’t see Hamilton until at least late-2013, but he will be ready by that point to make an immediate impact in the majors. Let’s take a look at Hamilton’s tools and how they project in the future.

First of all, if you are unfamiliar with Billy Hamilton, then you’ve probably been hiding under a rock. If you are hiding under a rock, you should probably come out. Unless, of course, you have Bryce Harper’s haircut. Anyways, Billy Hamilton grew up in Mississippi and played football, basketball, and baseball in high school. Hamilton was drafted in the second round of the 2009 MLB Amateur draft by the Reds, and passed up a football scholarship to Mississippi State University. Hamilton stands six feet tall and weighs roughly 160 pounds. He is a switch-hitting shortstop who is currently playing for the Reds High-A affiliate, the Bakersfield Blaze. Read the rest of this entry

Twins Pitching Prospects to Remember

Tuesday May 1st, 2012

Sam Evans: The Twins have made it obvious they have no plans of contending this year. Their whole infield is pretty depressing and the pitching staff has looked awful. Minnesota doesn’t have an amazing farm system, but they do have some pitchers that probably will be in the majors in the coming years. Here is a review of a couple of the top Twins pitching prospects.

Madison Boer, RHP, A-Ball: Madison Boer is a twenty-two year old right-handed throwing starting pitcher. He was drafted in the 2011 2nd round out of the University of Oregon but he was born in Minnesota. His fastball sits in the low-90’s and he also has a slider and a splitter. Last year, in fifteen games pitching in relief in Rookie ball, Boer struck out thirty-one of the sixty-seven batters he faced.

In 2012, Boer has gotten off to another hot start. Facing A-Ball hitters, Boer has posted a 3.31 FIP. Unfortunately, his strikeout rates have not been close to where they were in 2011. This year, Boer has faced one hundred and sixteen batters, and only struck out twenty. He’s only had five starts, but his strikeout rates will definitely be something to watch this year. Overall, Boer could turn into a solid #3 starter for the Twins. I’m sure the Twins would be thrilled if they could get that kind of value from a second round pick. Read the rest of this entry

Where Are They Now: From Retired MLB Players to Minor League Managers and Coaches

Sunday May 29, 2011

MLB reports:  Having attended many baseball games in my lifetime, I was reflecting the other day on life after retirement for baseball players.  Getting to watch players for upwards of 20 years, one day each and every one departs the game eventually.  Once their playing careers are over and the players hang up their spikes for the last time, fans often ask: what happens to them?  This is a question I find myself asking time and time again.  Some players turn into broadcasters and scouts.  Some retire and live on secluded islands, never to be seen again.  Some are lucky enough to find jobs in the major league level, from front office positions to on-field coaching assignments.  However, many that wish to stay in the game end up going back to the minors and starting over.

Looking at the list of minor league managers and coaches, familiar names from days gone by get triggered.  What I did notice though was a reoccurring theme.  With the exception of few, you are unlikely to find too many hall-of-famers and superstar players in the grass-roots levels.  The best coaches and managers, occurring to many industry people that I have spoken with, are within the role players and grinders that studied the game well and fought for their playing careers.  Ex-catchers are often labelled as strong future managers and coaches for their knowledge of the game.  A superstar often gets by on talent and skill, but their results on the field do not always translate well in the dugout.  To be a good manager or coach, you have to know the game inside and out and be able to teach, motivate and get the most results out of your players and team.  Grinders, catchers, utility players, bottom-end starters and middle relievers are the ones that had to fight for every day, week, month and season to be kept on a major league roster.  Being able to squeeze maximum results out of limited ability often as a player will lead to success as a future coach or manager.  Or so the theory goes.

Take some of today’s active big league managers.  From Mike Scoscia, to Bud Black, John Farrell, Joe Girardi, and Ozzie Guillen among others, we see a list of managers that had long-lasting playing careers but were never hall-of-fame material.  The above list of managers got by as players on smarts, craftiness, effort and getting the most out of their abilities.  The same characteristics these men had as players, they are now forging for their respective teams as big league managers.  While superstar players turned into managers have and will continue to exist, like Pete Rose and Ryne Sandberg for example, they are the exception rather than the norm.  Part of the reason could be that role type players just make better managers.  Other reasons could be that superstars with their lifetime playing career incomes do not have the desire to take on manager and coaching roles with little financial reward.  Superstars are also less likely to take the busses and go back to the minors to work their way back to the majors.  The end result though is that in most cases, it will take a certain breed of ex-players to manage and coach in the minors after their playing careers are finished.

As of the 2011 season, I have prepared a list of ex-MLB players who can be found coaching and managing in the minors.  I have based this list on the better known players for reference sake.  Each person on the list has their organization, level and position noted.  If nothing else, this list will serve as a wonderful walk down memory lane to remember some of our favorite players from the past and find where they are managing or coaching currently.

Our noted coaches and managers in the minors are as follows: (Note SS= Short Season, Rookie= Rookie level)

Paul Abbott – SS Pitching Coach (Red Sox)

Edgardo Alfonzo – Rookie Coach (Astros)

Wally Backman – AA Manager (Mets)

Damon Berryhill – Rookie Manager (Dodgers)

Willie Blair – Low A Pitching Coach (Padres)

Ricky Bones – AAA Pitching Coach (Mets)

D.J. Boston – Rookie Coach (Braves)

Jeff Branson – AAA Coach (Pirates)

Jerry Browne – AAA Coach (Nationals)

Tom Browning – Rookie Pitching Coach (Reds)

Tom Brunansky – AA Coach (Twins)

Steve Buechele – AA Manager (Rangers)

Dave Burba – SS Pitching Coach (Rockies)

Brett Butler – AAA Manager (Diamondbacks)

Frank Castillo – Rookie Pitching Coach (Cubs)

Phil Clark – High A Coach (Indians)

Gregg Colbrunn – Low A Coach (Yankees)

Scott Coolbaugh – AAA Coach (Rangers)

Brian Daubach – Low A Manager (Nationals)

Chili Davis – AAA Coach (Red Sox)

Storm Davis – Low A Pitching Coach (Rangers)

Steve Decker – AAA Manager (Giants)

Delino DeShields – Low A Manager (Reds)

Rich Donnelly – SS Manager (Mets)

Doug Drabek – High A Pitching Coach (Diamondbacks)

Mariano Duncan – AA Coach (Cubs)

Leon Durham – AAA Coach (Tigers)

Sal Fasano – AA Manager (Jays)

Jeff Fassero – Low A Pitching Coach (Cubs)

Tom Filer – AAA Pitching Coach (Pirates)

Tony Fossas – Low A Pitching Coach (Reds)

Rich Gedman – SS Coach (Red Sox)

Jim Gott – Rookie Pitching Coach (Angels)

Tommy Gregg – AAA Coach (Royals)

Ken Griffey Sr. – High A Manager (Reds)

Brian Harper – AA Manager (Cubs)

Jeff Harris – Low A Pitching Coach (Indians)

Lenny Harris – Low A Coach (Dodgers)

Ron Hassey – High A Manager (Marlins)

Greg Hibbard – SS Pitching Coach (Indians)

Bobby Jones – AAA Manager (Rangers)

Kevin Jordan – Rookie Coach (Phillies)

Pat Kelly – Rookie Manager (Reds)

Terry Kennedy – AAA Manager (Padres)

Steve Kline – Low A Pitching Coach (Giants)

Randy Knorr – AAA Manager (Nationals)

Tim Laker – AAA Coach (White Sox)

Les Lancaster – Rookie Pitching Coach (Phillies)

Tom Lawless – AA Manager (Astros)

Matt LeCroy – High A Manager (Nationals)

Craig Lefferts – High A Pitching Coach (Athletics)

Doug Linton- AAA Pitching Coach (Rockies)

Nelson Liriano – Rookie Manager (Royals)

Dennis Martinez – High A Pitching Coach (Cardinals)

Joe McEwing – AAA Manager (White Sox)

Bob Milacki – AA Pitching Coach (Phillies)

Mickey Morandini – SS Manager (Phillies)

Phil Nevin – AAA Manager (Tigers)

Greg Norton – AAA Manager (Marlins)

Lance Painter – AA Pitching Coach (Mariners)

Phil Plantier – High A Coach (Padres)

Ariel Prieto – Rookie Pitching Coach (Athletics)

Tom Prince – Rookie Manager (Pirates)

Mike Redmond – Low A Manager (Jays)

Jody Reed – Rookie Manager (Dodgers)

Pete Rose Jr. – Rookie Manager (White Sox)

Luis Salazar – High A Manager (Braves)

Ryne Sandberg – AAA Manager (Phillies)

Dick Schofield – Rookie Coach (Angels)

Kelly Stinnett – Rookie Manager (Diamondbacks)

Franklin Stubbs – AA Coach (Dodgers)

Tim Teufel – AAA Manager (Mets)

Bobby Thigpen – High A Pitching Coach (White Sox)

Randy Tomlin – AA Pitching Coach (Nationals)

John Valentin – AAA Coach (Dodgers)

Frank Viola – SS Pitching Coach (Mets)

Matt Walbeck – Low A Manager (Braves)

Pete Walker – AA Pitching Coach (Jays)

Turner Ward – AA Manager (Diamondbacks)

U.L. Washington – Rookie Coach (Red Sox)

Trevor Wilson – Low A Pitching Coach (Angels)

Vance Wilson – Low A Manager (Royals)

Shawn Wooten – Low A Manager (Padres)

 

From the above list, it will be interesting to see which of these ex-players end up graduating to the big leagues and in what capacity.  Many will find that the road to the show as a player was actually easier than the path as a manager or coach.  We fondly remember many of these individuals for their contributions to the game of baseball on the field.  We look forward to finding out which of them will be able to find similar success in the dugout.

 

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Ryan Tatusko: MLB Guest Blog

The players speak: MLB reports devotes this page to the players who will be writing blogs in their own words to you, the readers.

The inaugural MLB Guest Blog comes from Ryan Tatusko of the Washington Nationals.  Ryan currently pitches for the AA Harrisburg Senators of the Eastern League.

April 21, 2011

Ryan Tatusko:  This year was a different year for me in preparation for many reasons. For one, I was starting out with a new team that I really know nothing about.  Furthermore, I am going to be a full-time starter this year. In the past, when I was with the Texas Rangers, I was would routinely ping-pong between the bullpen and the starting rotation based on where they, the organization, would need me.  I would then usually stick in the rotation around the all-star game, but this year was different. The Nationals have told me that at this time they envision me as helping the ball club as a starting pitcher and that’s where they wanted to keep me.

Heading into the season as a starter, I did not necessarily change the way I went about my off-season preparation or conditioning, but I did tweak a few things here and there. For instance, as part of my bullpen sessions, I wouldn’t throw them as frequently as I would when I started the season as a reliever.  Instead, I would do fewer sessions with more pitchers.  I also made sure that I would do more long distance cardio work to build my stamina for the upcoming year. My preparation for camp has never changed in the 4+ years that I have been going.  The team you are with gives you a pretty set schedule as to what to do in terms of running, lifting, and throwing and as long as you follow it, you will be just fine and will be ready to go when camp starts.

Getting to camp this year was fun and exciting for me as I got the feeling that I was a fresh face all over again, the same feelings I got when I was first drafted by the Rangers came back.  I was excited, maybe too excited. The first few games I played in I probably tried to do too much.  But once I settled down and starting getting back to my game, I felt like I had very good success during spring training. I really wanted to work on throwing my change-up for strikes more in camp, as it seems to be a pitch that has been less effective for me as compared to my other pitches.  By the time that I left Viera,FL I felt that I made immense strides with it and I was extremely happy with the way I was throwing it and with the confidence I was displaying.

Not understanding where you are going to be assigned is one of those things that can consume you if you are not careful.  When you start to think about the potential moves that the organization could and should make, you start to drive yourself crazy and you get distracted from what you do on the mound. It’s one of those things you just got to try your best to block out and not think about as you go through your process and getting ready for the season.  There is always a rhyme and a reason that people do things and although it might not be evidently clear at the first get go as to why; you eventually find out.

I have since been assigned to AA Harrisburg to begin the year.  I have made a few starts and although one particularly has not gone the way I would have liked it too, it is still very early on in the season.  I see these starts as an opportunity for me to learn from my mistakes and to grow as a pitcher. There are numerous quotes and clichés out there that talk about having a short memory if you want to succeed at this game and they are all absolutely true. There is a fine line between learning and obsessing over particular starts.  There is always something positive and negative to get out of taking the mound, but as a player you have to be careful and not let it consume you and over-think about the process. The really good pitchers out there learn and move on the quickest so that they can devote all their time to their next outing.

I am eager to get back on the mound quickly and progress through the season.   I have never felt stronger mentally and physically and I can’t wait to see what the season has in store for me.

Thanks for reading.

Ryan

***A special thank you to Ryan Tatusko for his time and effort in preparing his guest MLB blog entry for MLB reports.  Please follow Ryan on Twitter.  In addition to being a talented pitcher, Ryan is a tremendous person and loves interacting with his fans.  A friend of MLB reports, we look forward to reporting on Ryan throughout the season as he continues his journey to Washington.  Good luck Ryan!***

To learn more about Ryan, please view our February profile of Ryan Tatusko.

Please e-mail us at: MLBreports@gmail.com with any questions and feedback.  You can follow us on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook .  To subscribe to our website and have the daily Reports sent directly to your inbox , click here and follow the link at the top of our homepage.

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