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Sully Baseball Daily Podcast – January 27, 2014

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This poster of the Pittsburgh Crawfords’ great team made me think about how far we have come in the integration of baseball. And yet there are still some barriers that need to be broken.

We’ve seen today’s answer to Oscar Charleston and Josh Gibson make the majors.

Smithsonian

Smithsonian

What about today’s Jackie Mitchell?

Who? That answer and more and more on today’s episode of The Sully Baseball Daily Podcast.

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Sully Baseball Daily Podcast – January 26, 2014

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Triple Play Podcast Ep #8 – Bucs And Nats Time In The Around The Horn Feature

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Monday, May  13th, 2013

The Triple Play Show will have 5 shows per month.  Each show will be about 1 hour

The Triple Play Show will have 5 shows per month. Each show will be about 1 hour.

By The Big Ticket Show ( AKA Triple Play Podcast on http://www.mlbreports.com)

Guests in this Podcast – MLB Reports Nationals Correspondent David Huzzard of Citizensofnatstown.com ( and MLB Reports Pirates Correspondent Brad Cuprik

On a Mother’s day edition of the triple play podcast we heed the advice of our mother’s and turn the lemon of our original guest being unable to join us into the lemonade of Bard Cuprik of mlbreports.com  (Check out his latest Roster Tree piece – where he goes through the 6 degrees of separation of a how each pitcher arrived in a Bucs uniform here ) – and David Huzzard of the Citizens of Natstown podcast (and Writer) dissects the pitching and the Nationals start to the 2013 Season. Read the rest of this entry

Remembering Baseball’s African – American Pioneers

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Thursday Feb.28th, 2013

 Address: 1616 E 18th St, Kansas City, MO 64108, United StatesPhone:+1 816-221-1920 Hours: Thursday hours 9:00 am–6:00 pm

Address: 1616 E 18th St, Kansas City, MO 64108, United States
Phone:+1 816-221-1920
Hours: Thursday hours 9:00 am–6:00 pm

By Haley Smilow (MLB Reports Junior Reporter and Writer): 

February is black history month. This made me think about the impact that African-Americans have had on the sports world. One of the biggest impacts, in my opinion, was the Negro Leagues. In August 2011, I was lucky enough to go to Kansas City to see a Royals vs. Yankees game. What I did not know was the history of baseball in K.C. is more then just the Royals.

I learned about many great players and the history of a great league on my visit to the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum. I never imaged that baseball was once divided based on the color of your skin. The Negro Leagues Baseball Museum is dedicated to preserving the history of great black players. In the 1920’s, a structured league of black players began under the guidance of Rube Foster, and The Negro Leagues were born.

The Negro Leagues had many great players and stories of men like Satchel Paige, James “Cool Papa” Bell, Josh Gibson, Buck O’Neil, Jackie Robinson and many others, including one amazing women named Effa Manley. What made these people great were their astonishing abilities.

Jackie Robinson Steals Home Plate!

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Baseball As My Muse: Baseball Artist Margie Lawrence – Guest Blog

Saturday June 9th, 2012

Margie Lawrence (Guest Blogger):  Having grown up blocks from the friendly confines of Wrigley Field, I had no choice but to fall in love with the Cubs. 

 

The organ music and cheers of the crowd would drift through the open windows of my school, which sat a mere block from the bleacher entrance. And like many of my loves, the Cubs have disappointed me, but I still keep the hope alive that one day everything will be all right in the world and they—we— will win a World Series.

 

My first baseball memory involved 20 or so family members crowded around the portable TV cheering Sandy Koufax on during the 1963 World Series. Later on, I would pretend I was Sandy or Fergie Jenkins or Ken Holtzman, throwing what I perceived to be a curve ball at a small painted square on a brick wall. That square was always Mickey Mantle, for some reason. I was 11, it was 1969. My height was about that of a munchkin, and I may have weighed at 65 pounds.  If only I could have played on a Little League team…but damn those girl chromosomes. (And damn those Mets!) Read the rest of this entry

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