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Forget The DH, Forget The Pitcher Hitting, Lets Hit With 8! Also Teams Should Hit Best Players At The Top

Disagree with me all you want, but I think the MLB would be better served to have just 8 hitters hit in one rotation of the batting order.  It is time to eliminate the DH and the pitcher both from hitting.  Give the fans more of what they want, the most feared hitters in baseball potentially batting 70 - 80 times more a year.

Disagree with me all you want, but I think the MLB would be better served to have just 8 hitters hit in one rotation of the batting order. It is time to eliminate the DH and the pitcher both from hitting. Give the fans more of what they want, the most feared hitters in baseball potentially batting 70 – 80 times more a year.  I also agree with Sully Baseball, that your best hitters should be afforded the most opportunities to contribute to your offense.  This means hitting in the highest slot in the order they can based on OBP, Slugging and overall Run production.

By Chuck Booth (Lead Baseball Analyst/Website Owner): w/assist to “Lead Personality” Paul Sullivan (Sully)

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(The 8 hitters in  lineup concept is my idea solely, I am agreeing with Sully on his lineup relevance for his approach for 1 and 2 hitters) – CB

I was listening to an archived show I did with James Acevedo, on our inaugural “2 And A Hook Podcast” show last March.

We were talking about the Designated Hitter position weakening by the year, and the Pitcher not doing any justice at the plate either.

In the show, I haphazardly referred to “they should just hit with 8 hitters.”

I forgot about the whole thing soon after saying it last year, but now I haven’t stopped thinking about for the last hour of today.

Baseball writers often will tell you it is best to write what is fresh on your mind. Read the rest of this entry

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Sully Baseball Daily Podcast – November 29, 2013

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While reading through the book Billy Ball by Billy Martin (and Phil Pepe), I stumbled across an interesting passage.

Evidently Billy Martin and I had similar ideas of how to set up a batting order… one where common sense triumphs of conventional wisdom.

I recorded today’s episode of The Sully Baseball Daily Podcast next to a swimming pool.

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Sully Baseball Daily Podcast – November 29, 2013

Red Sox Great Dwight Evans Falls Short Of 2013 Expansion Era Ballot For Hall Of Fame

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By Patrick Languzzi (Cooperstown Correspondent)

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On November 4th the National Baseball Hall of Fame released the names of 12 candidates selected to the Expansion Era ballot of the Veterans Committee. 

The Expansion Era is composed of players, executives and managers who made their greatest career contributions between 1973 – present.

Of the 12 selected, any candidate receiving 12 of 16 votes, (seventy-five percent) will gain election into The National Baseball Hall of Fame with a ceremonial induction scheduled for July of 2014.

Dwight Evans Cannon For An Arm

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BBWAA Historical Overview Committee To Devise 2014 Expansion Era Ballot

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Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Photo by rsnalberta.blogspot.com

By Patrick Languzzi (Cooperstown Correspondent):  

From January 29th – 31st, the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) Historical Overview Committee met in Cooperstown to screen potential candidates for the 2014 Expansion Era ballot (Veterans Committee). The 12-member ballot will be released in the fall and is scheduled to be voted on at the baseball winter meetings in December by a 16-member electorate.

The Expansion Era is comprised of players, executives and managers who made their greatest career contributions between 1973 – present. Eligible players must be retired for at least 21 years and have played at least 10 major league seasons. Managers and Umpires are eligible five years after retirement, with 10 years of service, or six months from the date of election after retirement, if they are 65 years or older.

All candidates receiving at least 12 of 16 votes (75 percent of the 16 ballots) will gain election into the National Baseball Hall of Fame for a July 2014 ceremonial induction.

Under the new rules, the Veterans Committee ballots run on a three-year rotation beginning in 2010 with the Expansion Era (1973 – present), Golden Era (1947 – 1972) and Pre-Integration Era (1871 – 1946).

Here’s a look at the selected nominees from 2010. Long retired players; Dave Concepcion, Steve Garvey, Vida Blue, Ron Guidry, Tommy John, Al Oliver, Rusty Staub and Ted Simmons. Manager Billy Martin and executives George Steinbrenner, Pat Gillick and Marvin Miller.

Pat Gillick HOF Induction Speech:

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Reggie Jackson: The Man, The Myth, But Really a Legend?

Monday June 18th, 2012

Robert Whitmer (Baseball Writer):  

            There are moments in time that stick in out head.  Moments that will define people for the rest of their days.  Most people have the birth of their children, their wedding day, or the first day on their first job.  We don’t need camcorders (for readers my age and older) or cell phones (for my younger readers who don’t know what a camcorder is) to record these images because they will be etched in our heads by our own accord.  We have these moments on the baseball field as well.  Most remember Jason Kendall for the horrific ankle injury that happened while trying to beat a throw.  You know the one where the bottom of his foot is upwards instead of downwards.  Babe Ruth was an outstanding player and the first power hitter of the game.  He is remembered for supposedly calling where his home run was going to land and backing it up by hitting it there.  Unless you watched him on a regular basis, you remember the great Willie Mays for that over-the-shoulder catch, the spin, and the throw while falling down to clear it from the outfield.  If you’re a Red Sox fan, you remember Curt Schilling, as great as he was, for that bloody sock in the World Series.  Often times, if we look beyond these moments, we see careers that should define the player but often do not.  You don’t have to be a legend to have moments that define you.  Sometimes it’s the moments that we don’t forget, that make you a legend.  Reggie Jackson had his moment that defined him as a player, but is that all that we should remember him for? Read the rest of this entry

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