Luhnow Spins His Trade Magic Again For The Astros In: Get Carter

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Wednesday Feb.6, 2013

Lowrie had a stellar 1st half, cracking 14 HRs and 36 RBI, while holding a 3 Slash Line of .253/.343/.803.  He slumped to a .200/.273/.606 in the 2nd half slump after being hurt in July.  He is 28 Years Old and under team control for the A's only through the 2014 seaseon.

Lowrie had a stellar 1st half, cracking 14 HRs and 36 RBI, while holding a 3 Slash Line of .253/.343/.803. He slumped to a .200/.273/.606 in a 2nd half slump after being hurt in July. He is 28 Years Old and under team control for the A’s only through the 2014 season.

By Richard Perez (Astros Correspondent):

As I’m sure you’ve heard by now, the Astros have traded Shortstop Jed Lowrie and Pitcher Fernando Rodriguez to the Oakland A’s for Chris Carter, Brad Peacock, and Minor leaguer Max Stassi. Astros mastermind General Manager Jeff Luhnow worked out another amazing trade, getting anybody to agree to take Fernando Rodriguez all on its own is a miracle, but getting more than what he’s worth is astounding.

He’s worked nothing but pure trade magic during his first full calendar year with the club, dumping off Dan Carpenter, Brandon Lyon, AND Carlos Lee over the course of last season. Not to mention plenty other players he traded as well, yielding a number a top prospects, making the Astros’ farm system go from worst to first.

Jed Lowrie Highlights – Mature Lyrics so Parental Guidance is advised:

Chris Carter had a 3 Slash Line of .239/.350/.864 in 218 AB during the 2012 season. He clubbed 16 HRs and 39 RBI. He hit 11 HRs in just 122 AB away from o.co Coliseum. At just Age 26 - and team controllable until 2019, it is weird that Billy Beane would trade away the slugging 1B/DH

Chris Carter had a 3 Slash Line of .239/.350/.864 in 218 AB during the 2012 season. He clubbed 16 HRs and 39 RBI. He hit 11 HRs in just 122 AB away from o.co Coliseum. At just Age 26 – and team controllable until 2019, it is weird that Billy Beane would trade away the slugging 1B/DH.  The Astros have landed themselves a nice power hitter with a ton of potential, but a low Batting Average

I’m sure we’re all saddened by the departure of Lowrie whom had grown to be a fan favorite, and was very vocal during the Astros CAREavan recent stops about leading the Astros’ rebuilding process. There was plenty of speculation about the Astros even withholding him till the season, or at least Spring Training to possibly get more trade value for him. More than likely the reason for the Astros abrupt trading of Lowrie was that he has been prone to injury, and it was best to strike while the iron was hot. Obviously, an injured player isn’t likely to be worth much, even more so if he’s out for the season.

Despite all of that, Lowrie is Oakland’s problem now.

Even though we may see him have a great game or two against us, or even see his highlights on ESPN like Chris Johnson’s grand slam for Arizona just a short time after we traded him, but we dumped off a hobbled shortstop whose health could be considered suspect. The Astros, in exchange, received a decent arm in Brad Peacock, who was rated the 42nd overall prospect in 2011, Chris Carter, a potential solid outfielder with a room for plenty of improvement at the plate, and Max Stassi, a young minor leaguer who is still at the Advanced A level. To think that basically we traded Mark Melancon for four players overall, if you include Kyle Weiland from Boston, is a rather astounding accomplishment for any general manager of a professional club.

I am going to discredit the struggles of Carter, more specifically, his woes at the plate. At the ripe age of 26, four years the elder of Astros All-Star Second Baseman Jose Altuve, Chris Carter struggled during his first tenure in the major leagues, because quite frankly, Oakland is a rather dismal place to play ball. Oakland, for the time being, is to baseball, as to what Cleveland is to football. Dismal, disappointing, and usually a place where careers end, or never blossom. The Athletics organization deserves a much better stadium than the O.co Coliseum, a venue which they share with the Oakland Raiders. The dismal stadium is a testament to how hard it is to juggle baseball and football in the same venue.

Arming themselves with new faces just before the trucks begin loading up and ship off the Kissimmee, the Astros’ spring will be just as exciting as it could be for Astros fans, probably one of the most exciting time of the season for us Astros fans, unless Carlos Pena and belt another 23 home runs to get to 300. The start of Spring Training is only days away, and it is far too soon to exactly tell what will come of it, but just like last year, everybody will have a shot to make the major league roster and you can guarantee that every last of them will be fighting for their spot.

General Manager Jeff Luhnow has stockpiled a lot of talent in the Minor Leagues in the last few years.

General Manager Jeff Luhnow has stockpiled a lot of talent in the Minor Leagues in the last few months.

*** The views and opinions expressed in this report are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of mlbreports.com or their partners.***

A big thank-you goes out to our ‘Astros Correspondent’ Richard Perez for preparing today’s featured article.  Richard is the senior staff writer at torotimes.com here and owns the Astros websites the StrosBros here.   Richard resides in Corpus Christi, TX, Equestria.  Richard has followed the team from the Houston Astrodome, all the way to the opening of Enron field – now called Minute Maid Park. Follow Richard  on Twitter and talk about the games of Baseball

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About Richard Perez

Dedicated San Antonio Spurs, Houston Astros and Texans fan; I've has been loyal to his teams since birth. The Astros have been my favorite team since my first game in '95 in the Astrodome, and all the way to Opening Day at Enron Field. I loved the Oilers as a child, and followed them until they're departure, and followed them as the Tennessee Oilers until 1999 when another Houston team was conceived. I've loved my Spurs since going to see my first game in the Alamodome in '96. I've been dedicated to my teams since I was first introduced to them. My loyalty is irrefutable and undeniable.

Posted on February 6, 2013, in MLB Payroll and Contracts, MLB Teams: Articles and Analysis, Players: Fantasy Baseball Articles, The Rest: Everything Baseball and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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